Discussion:
Civil war at Ferrari
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MT2
2018-10-06 11:38:37 UTC
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Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene labelled his team's tyre choice blunder in Formula 1's Japanese Grand Prix qualifying "unacceptable", blasting a lack of "common sense" on the pitwall.
Wasn't that Arrivabene I saw on the pitwall today? Will Arrivabene jump
or wait until he's pushed?
John
2018-10-06 21:33:44 UTC
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How many times this, and last, year have Ferrari badly blundered on tire choice.
larkim
2018-10-08 12:08:58 UTC
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Post by John
How many times this, and last, year have Ferrari badly blundered on tire choice.
I wonder how much Seb's crash in Germany was factored into their thoughts
about putting the inters on at the start of Q3 on Saturday? Either explicitly
or less overtly.
Sir Tim
2018-10-08 17:49:56 UTC
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Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene labelled his team's tyre choice
blunder in Formula 1's Japanese Grand Prix qualifying "unacceptable",
blasting a lack of "common sense" on the pitwall.
Wasn't that Arrivabene I saw on the pitwall today?  Will Arrivabene jump
or wait until he's pushed?
From Grandprix.com:

'An editorial in Corriere della Sera, an Italian newspaper, links
Ferrari's performance drop with the death in July of Sergio Marchionne.

Correspondent Daniele Sparisci said the former president was the
"custodian of internal balance", and in the absence of that, Ferrari has
split into two warring factions.

On one side, reportedly, is team boss Maurizio Arrivabene, and on the
other is Mattia Binotto, who is regarded as second in line for the throne.

"It is said that relations between them is at a historic low," said
Sparisci.'

Ferrari has always suffered from internal politics, especially when
Italians are in charge. The only time there was accord seems to have
been during the Todt, Brawn, Schumacher era.
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
MT2
2018-10-08 18:55:36 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene labelled his team's tyre choice
blunder in Formula 1's Japanese Grand Prix qualifying "unacceptable",
blasting a lack of "common sense" on the pitwall.
Wasn't that Arrivabene I saw on the pitwall today?  Will Arrivabene
jump or wait until he's pushed?
'An editorial in Corriere della Sera, an Italian newspaper, links
Ferrari's performance drop with the death in July of Sergio Marchionne.
Correspondent Daniele Sparisci said the former president was the
"custodian of internal balance", and in the absence of that, Ferrari has
split into two warring factions.
On one side, reportedly, is team boss Maurizio Arrivabene, and on the
other is Mattia Binotto, who is regarded as second in line for the throne.
"It is said that relations between them is at a historic low," said
Sparisci.'
Ferrari has always suffered from internal politics, especially when
Italians are in charge. The only time there was accord seems to have
been during the Todt, Brawn, Schumacher era.
Enzo deliberately set his staff against one another. The culture he
created continues to this day. Piero Ferrari even had a car designed and
secretly built in opposition to the one being made by John Barnard. The
Borgia's survive in Maranello.
Sir Tim
2018-10-11 17:49:40 UTC
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Post by MT2
Enzo deliberately set his staff against one another.
He certainly did but in the case of Stirling Moss this approach
backfired badly. Having been promised a drive at Bari in 1951 Moss
travelled to Italy only to be told that the drive had been given to
Taruffi and that the Commendatore could not meet him. After this
humiliation Moss vowed that he would never drive for Ferrari. Despite
several subsequent approaches from Enzo he never did.


The culture he
Post by MT2
created continues to this day. Piero Ferrari even had a car designed and
secretly built in opposition to the one being made by John Barnard.  The
Borgia's survive in Maranello.
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
D Munz
2018-10-09 12:59:32 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene labelled his team's tyre choice
blunder in Formula 1's Japanese Grand Prix qualifying "unacceptable",
blasting a lack of "common sense" on the pitwall.
Wasn't that Arrivabene I saw on the pitwall today?  Will Arrivabene jump
or wait until he's pushed?
'An editorial in Corriere della Sera, an Italian newspaper, links
Ferrari's performance drop with the death in July of Sergio Marchionne.
Correspondent Daniele Sparisci said the former president was the
"custodian of internal balance", and in the absence of that, Ferrari has
split into two warring factions.
On one side, reportedly, is team boss Maurizio Arrivabene, and on the
other is Mattia Binotto, who is regarded as second in line for the throne.
"It is said that relations between them is at a historic low," said
Sparisci.'
Ferrari has always suffered from internal politics, especially when
Italians are in charge. The only time there was accord seems to have
been during the Todt, Brawn, Schumacher era.
--
Sir Tim
“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
Bring back Luca?

FWIW
DLM
keefy
2018-10-11 06:51:06 UTC
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Post by D Munz
Post by Sir Tim
Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene labelled his team's tyre choice
blunder in Formula 1's Japanese Grand Prix qualifying "unacceptable",
blasting a lack of "common sense" on the pitwall.
Wasn't that Arrivabene I saw on the pitwall today?  Will Arrivabene jump
or wait until he's pushed?
'An editorial in Corriere della Sera, an Italian newspaper, links
Ferrari's performance drop with the death in July of Sergio Marchionne.
Correspondent Daniele Sparisci said the former president was the
"custodian of internal balance", and in the absence of that, Ferrari has
split into two warring factions.
On one side, reportedly, is team boss Maurizio Arrivabene, and on the
other is Mattia Binotto, who is regarded as second in line for the throne.
"It is said that relations between them is at a historic low," said
Sparisci.'
Ferrari has always suffered from internal politics, especially when
Italians are in charge. The only time there was accord seems to have
been during the Todt, Brawn, Schumacher era.
--
Sir Tim
“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
Bring back Luca?
FWIW
DLM
Would that be Luca Badoer? To replace Vettel, presumably! Well, the
thought amused me for a few seconds anyway.
D Munz
2018-10-11 13:31:49 UTC
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Post by keefy
Post by D Munz
Post by Sir Tim
Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene labelled his team's tyre choice
blunder in Formula 1's Japanese Grand Prix qualifying "unacceptable",
blasting a lack of "common sense" on the pitwall.
Wasn't that Arrivabene I saw on the pitwall today?  Will Arrivabene jump
or wait until he's pushed?
'An editorial in Corriere della Sera, an Italian newspaper, links
Ferrari's performance drop with the death in July of Sergio Marchionne.
Correspondent Daniele Sparisci said the former president was the
"custodian of internal balance", and in the absence of that, Ferrari has
split into two warring factions.
On one side, reportedly, is team boss Maurizio Arrivabene, and on the
other is Mattia Binotto, who is regarded as second in line for the throne.
"It is said that relations between them is at a historic low," said
Sparisci.'
Ferrari has always suffered from internal politics, especially when
Italians are in charge. The only time there was accord seems to have
been during the Todt, Brawn, Schumacher era.
--
Sir Tim
“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
Bring back Luca?
FWIW
DLM
Would that be Luca Badoer? To replace Vettel, presumably! Well, the
thought amused me for a few seconds anyway.
Oops, forgot about him. I meant Luca di Montezemolo.

Seems like he was in charge the last time they had any real success. Of course, there were lots of other too...

FWIW
DLM
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