Discussion:
Is it just me underwhelmed by lottery races like yesterday?
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larkim
2019-07-29 14:10:34 UTC
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I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather, safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation to F1.

Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a tabloid version of F1.

A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.

Am I the only one?
News
2019-07-29 14:38:28 UTC
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Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather, safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Would have vied for 'race of the era', absent myriad safety car periods.
Dan the Man
2019-07-29 15:58:25 UTC
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Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather, safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that the best car didn't win.
~misfit~
2019-07-30 04:01:44 UTC
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Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather, safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That dragstrip skid pad just off the
track on a corner - who thought that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?

Frankly a race where Stroll is 4th and Kubica gets a point is a farce IMO.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM"
David Melville

This is not an email and hasn't been checked for viruses by any half-arsed self-promoting software.
geoff
2019-07-30 05:13:32 UTC
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Post by ~misfit~
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a
tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying
line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's
skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when
the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly
dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall
leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought that was
a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have been wet?
Frankly a race where Stroll is 4th and Kubica gets a point is a farce IMO.
Yes, the results were more a result of chance wrt to the timing of
weather events rather than mainly driver skill in the conditions.

Not to say that there wasn't some good driving involved. And equally
there certainly was some poor driving from those you wouldn't expect it
from.

geoff
t***@gmail.com
2019-07-30 12:50:53 UTC
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Post by ~misfit~
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That dragstrip skid pad just off the
track on a corner - who thought that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
Frankly a race where Stroll is 4th and Kubica gets a point is a farce IMO.
--
Shaun.
"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM"
David Melville
This is not an email and hasn't been checked for viruses by any half-arsed self-promoting software.
Oh poor you and your pirated tv coverage,
on your 11 yr old laptop. Fucking crybaby.
Willsy
2019-07-31 10:30:46 UTC
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Post by ~misfit~
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather, safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That dragstrip skid pad just off the
track on a corner - who thought that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the wet patch.
Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat (presumably learning from
their mistakes, and others that made the same error on that part of the track)
did.

A wet race forces you to change your driving style, which is why it's such
a lottery - some of the fast (dry) drivers will not be so good in the wet,
or perhaps they'll push just a little bit too much (e.g. Vettel last year at
the same track, who is a great wet driver but pushed just a little too much).

Also, the pit crews really get tested and it makes for a very interesting
afternoon indeed.

I say stick sprinklers on certain parts of every track and let the fun ensue!

:-)
larkim
2019-07-31 12:14:25 UTC
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Post by Willsy
Post by ~misfit~
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather, safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That dragstrip skid pad just off the
track on a corner - who thought that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the wet patch.
Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat (presumably learning from
their mistakes, and others that made the same error on that part of the track)
did.
A wet race forces you to change your driving style, which is why it's such
a lottery - some of the fast (dry) drivers will not be so good in the wet,
or perhaps they'll push just a little bit too much (e.g. Vettel last year at
the same track, who is a great wet driver but pushed just a little too much).
Also, the pit crews really get tested and it makes for a very interesting
afternoon indeed.
I say stick sprinklers on certain parts of every track and let the fun ensue!
:-)
I have no issue with a wet race, or a wet race drying throughout.

It was the inconsistency on Sunday that turned me off a little, especially
combined with SC timings, which meant that some drivers were genuinely
lucky with their final position.

Others have only themselves to blame (e.g. Hamilton, Bottas, Leclerc) and
should be expected to do better than they did in those conditions, and
demonstrate their skills at driving a car in less than ideal circumstances

I'm not going to say that it wasn't exciting - it was, undoubtedly.

But it was more akin to a football cup final being won by a goal scored
by a freak gust of wind blowing the ball in, or a Tour de France result
being settled due to a freak hailstorm and mud-slide ;-)

I want sporting events be solely decided on sporting grounds, not
fortuitous timings.

Verstappen deserved the win for a conservative drive benefitting from some
good timing, some luck and his main competitor leaving the track. Nothing
wrong with most of that.

But if every event had the same climate conditions and safety car occurences
it wouldn't give legitimacy to whoever won overall as being the best driver
and car combination; it would be who could throw a dice and get six most
often.
geoff
2019-07-31 21:05:40 UTC
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Post by larkim
I have no issue with a wet race, or a wet race drying throughout.
It was the inconsistency on Sunday that turned me off a little, especially
combined with SC timings, which meant that some drivers were genuinely
lucky with their final position.
Yes there was too much 'pure luck' involved. Good luck for some and bad
luck for others. And some drivers genuinely drove poorly irrespective of
the luck aspect, and others drove well.

geoff
Bigbird
2019-07-31 21:35:43 UTC
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Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.

If that were a typical race it would soon become boring. The biggest
turn off about indycar (and formerly cart ) are the number of full
course yellows that frequently negate much of the skilled and talented
racing that preceded them.
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
Bruce Hoult
2019-07-31 21:58:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
If that were a typical race it would soon become boring. The biggest
turn off about indycar (and formerly cart ) are the number of full
course yellows that frequently negate much of the skilled and talented
racing that preceded them.
I think if every race was like this one, a pattern would soon emerge with the better drivers accumulating more points than the bad drivers. There would be more variation in individual races than in the dry races we usually have (podium virtually always filled by drivers from Mercedes, Ferrari, and Red Bull) but I think the luck would average out.

The problem for F1 constructors would be that it would tend to be the best *drivers* at the front (and maybe the best strategists), not the best cars.

Eliminating the safety car in favour of the virtual safety car to the maximum extent possible would decrease the luck factor, especially of where a car happened to be at the instant the safety car is signaled. Pit stops under safety car would still benefit from the smaller speed differential, but not from the field being bunched up afterwards.
Out Cider
2019-07-31 22:32:58 UTC
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Post by Bruce Hoult
The problem for F1 constructors would be that it would tend to be the
best *drivers* at the front (and maybe the best strategists), not the
best cars.
Agreed.
Post by Bruce Hoult
Eliminating the safety car in favour of the virtual safety car to the
maximum extent possible would decrease the luck factor, especially of
where a car happened to be at the instant the safety car is
signaled. Pit stops under safety car would still benefit from the
smaller speed differential, but not from the field being bunched up
afterwards.
Agreed again.
--
OutCider
keithr0
2019-07-31 22:33:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce Hoult
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
If that were a typical race it would soon become boring. The biggest
turn off about indycar (and formerly cart ) are the number of full
course yellows that frequently negate much of the skilled and talented
racing that preceded them.
I think if every race was like this one, a pattern would soon emerge with the better drivers accumulating more points than the bad drivers. There would be more variation in individual races than in the dry races we usually have (podium virtually always filled by drivers from Mercedes, Ferrari, and Red Bull) but I think the luck would average out.
The problem for F1 constructors would be that it would tend to be the best *drivers* at the front (and maybe the best strategists), not the best cars.
Eliminating the safety car in favour of the virtual safety car to the maximum extent possible would decrease the luck factor, especially of where a car happened to be at the instant the safety car is signaled. Pit stops under safety car would still benefit from the smaller speed differential, but not from the field being bunched up afterwards.
Banning pit stops under the safety car would also reduce the lottery effect.
Bruce Hoult
2019-08-01 04:10:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by keithr0
Post by Bruce Hoult
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
If that were a typical race it would soon become boring. The biggest
turn off about indycar (and formerly cart ) are the number of full
course yellows that frequently negate much of the skilled and talented
racing that preceded them.
I think if every race was like this one, a pattern would soon emerge with the better drivers accumulating more points than the bad drivers. There would be more variation in individual races than in the dry races we usually have (podium virtually always filled by drivers from Mercedes, Ferrari, and Red Bull) but I think the luck would average out.
The problem for F1 constructors would be that it would tend to be the best *drivers* at the front (and maybe the best strategists), not the best cars.
Eliminating the safety car in favour of the virtual safety car to the maximum extent possible would decrease the luck factor, especially of where a car happened to be at the instant the safety car is signaled. Pit stops under safety car would still benefit from the smaller speed differential, but not from the field being bunched up afterwards.
Banning pit stops under the safety car would also reduce the lottery effect.
That would be possible now. It wasn't possible at times in the distant past because it gave a risk of cars running out of fuel behind the safety car through no fault of their own. That was a long time ago.

It would still be a problem for cars that are damaged (quite possibly in the same incident that caused the safety car) and are able to limp back to the pits but you don't really want them circulating around the track a dozen times with bits falling off them.
keithr0
2019-08-01 12:46:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bruce Hoult
Post by keithr0
Post by Bruce Hoult
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
If that were a typical race it would soon become boring. The biggest
turn off about indycar (and formerly cart ) are the number of full
course yellows that frequently negate much of the skilled and talented
racing that preceded them.
I think if every race was like this one, a pattern would soon emerge with the better drivers accumulating more points than the bad drivers. There would be more variation in individual races than in the dry races we usually have (podium virtually always filled by drivers from Mercedes, Ferrari, and Red Bull) but I think the luck would average out.
The problem for F1 constructors would be that it would tend to be the best *drivers* at the front (and maybe the best strategists), not the best cars.
Eliminating the safety car in favour of the virtual safety car to the maximum extent possible would decrease the luck factor, especially of where a car happened to be at the instant the safety car is signaled. Pit stops under safety car would still benefit from the smaller speed differential, but not from the field being bunched up afterwards.
Banning pit stops under the safety car would also reduce the lottery effect.
That would be possible now. It wasn't possible at times in the distant past because it gave a risk of cars running out of fuel behind the safety car through no fault of their own. That was a long time ago.
It would still be a problem for cars that are damaged (quite possibly in the same incident that caused the safety car) and are able to limp back to the pits but you don't really want them circulating around the track a dozen times with bits falling off them.
OK just ban tyre changes unless a tyre is damaged enough to prevent safe
driving.
t***@gmail.com
2019-08-01 01:18:27 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Bigbird
The biggest
turn off about indycar (and formerly cart ) are the number of full
course yellows that frequently negate much of the skilled and talented
racing that preceded them.
--
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
oh poor you and your gay ass sig
turn the channel
fucking idiot
Alan Baker
2019-08-01 01:23:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Bigbird
2019-08-01 04:49:46 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Alan Baker
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Get a life. There were 20 drivers out there that day. Your
anti-Hamilton focus belittles you and marginalises your opinion...
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
Alan Baker
2019-08-01 04:54:30 UTC
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Post by Bigbird
Post by Alan Baker
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Get a life. There were 20 drivers out there that day. Your
anti-Hamilton focus belittles you and marginalises your opinion...
I have no "anti-Hamilton" focus.

I was just pointing out that your hero didn't have the best day, and
utterly objectively, Kyvat drove better than he did.
Bigbird
2019-08-01 09:28:26 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Bigbird
Post by Alan Baker
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Get a life. There were 20 drivers out there that day. Your
anti-Hamilton focus belittles you and marginalises your opinion...
I have no "anti-Hamilton" focus.
I was just pointing out that your hero
There ya go. :)

He's not my hero by any means.

When's the last time I mentioned him doofus?

Yet in every controversy you are always in the anti-Hamilton camp. That
is no coincidence.
Post by Alan Baker
didn't have the best day, and
utterly objectively, Kyvat drove better than he did.
There is only one reason for you to focus on Hamilton in response to my
post and that is self-evident.

YFI
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
build
2019-08-02 01:56:32 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Alan, Your hook is too big and too blunt and your bait reeks. Only a fool would bite.
Alan Baker
2019-08-02 02:16:25 UTC
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Post by build
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Bigbird
Post by Willsy
Post by larkim
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's
like a tabloid version of F1.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a
drying line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a
driver's skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed
conditions, but when the timing of whether you are on the right
tyres or not is so highly dependent on a myriad of safety car
deployments etc, it just overall leaves me cold.
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that
the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought
that was a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have
been wet?
What's the issue? All you have to do is not put your wheels on the
wet patch. Bottas and Hamilton didn't manage to do that. Kvyat
(presumably learning from their mistakes, and others that made the
same error on that part of the track) did.
Were you under the impression that Kvyat drove to the front rather than
lucked into his team making the right call for the final stop? He
deserved his podium but it wasn't due to him being one of the best wet
weather drivers on the track that day.
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Alan, Your hook is too big and too blunt and your bait reeks. Only a fool would bite.
And yet he did!
Bigbird
2019-08-02 05:52:44 UTC
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by build
Post by Alan Baker
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Alan, Your hook is too big and too blunt and your bait reeks. Only a fool would bite.
And yet he did!
Lol, and there you did. Build might be a fool but he fooled you.

Suckered into an admission that you are nothing more that a trolling
twat.

You've just had a month in the Bozo bin; here you are begging for
another spell already.
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
Alan Baker
2019-08-02 06:00:09 UTC
Reply
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Post by Bigbird
Post by Alan Baker
Post by build
Post by Alan Baker
He was better than Hamilton in the wet on that particular day...
Alan, Your hook is too big and too blunt and your bait reeks. Only a fool would bite.
And yet he did!
Lol, and there you did. Build might be a fool but he fooled you.
Suckered into an admission that you are nothing more that a trolling
twat.
Nope. That he cast it in those terms made me reply in those terms.
Post by Bigbird
You've just had a month in the Bozo bin; here you are begging for
another spell already.
I'm crushed.
Bigbird
2019-08-02 08:15:23 UTC
Reply
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Post by Alan Baker
Post by Bigbird
You've just had a month in the Bozo bin; here you are begging for
another spell already.
I'm crushed.
I expect you really are... otherwise you would not be crying for
attention.

...and PLONK.

:)
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
Alan Baker
2019-08-02 16:43:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bigbird
Post by Alan Baker
Post by Bigbird
You've just had a month in the Bozo bin; here you are begging for
another spell already.
I'm crushed.
I expect you really are... otherwise you would not be crying for
attention.
...and PLONK.
:)
I think I'll cry now...

:(

t***@gmail.com
2019-08-02 04:52:12 UTC
Reply
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Post by build
Alan, Your hook is too big and too blunt and your bait reeks. Only a fool would bite.
put down the crack pipe
a425couple
2019-07-31 15:12:34 UTC
Reply
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Post by ~misfit~
Post by Dan the Man
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery --- it just overall
leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Well, it wasn't the usual Merc parade ... but it was true that the best car didn't win.
That's why I didn't enjoy it, it was TOO much of a lottery. That
dragstrip skid pad just off the track on a corner - who thought that was
a good idea at a track where the last two F1 races have been wet?
Hockenheimring, like all race tracks have to make money in
many ways to keep in existence (not get sold for housing,
or industrial, or commercial space).

One F1 race a year does not do it. In fact the vast majority
of F1 races lose money. The tracks have to raise revenue
day by day, week by week, and month by month with things
like local race series, motorcycle races, and drag races.
Most drivers working their way up are quite used to the
fact that the 'sticky' chemicals used on drag strip launch
areas are extremely slippery in the rain. That is why
the road race track at Hockenheimring totally avoids the
launch area. Many tracks have had to redo their road tracks
to avoid using that area of pavement.

People were complaining at France that there was no penalty
for going off track.
John
2019-07-29 20:13:06 UTC
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Yes, because a race that's over before the red lights go off is so much more fun.
Willsy
2019-07-31 10:25:53 UTC
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Post by John
Yes, because a race that's over before the red lights go off is so much more fun.
+1
Bigbird
2019-07-30 05:26:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a
tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying
line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's
skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when
the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly
dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall
leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
No.

Mind you I think the single biggest factor making the race a bit
farcical was the surface the other side of the kerbs on the last exit.
It seems both teams and many drivers did not comprehend the nature of
the surface until they experienced it themselves.
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
geoff
2019-07-30 08:45:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bigbird
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a
DNF or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in
relation to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a
tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying
line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's
skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when
the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly
dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall
leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
No.
Mind you I think the single biggest factor making the race a bit
farcical was the surface the other side of the kerbs on the last exit.
It seems both teams and many drivers did not comprehend the nature of
the surface until they experienced it themselves.
You would think that the teams would have made all drivers very aware of
it after the first car to have a mishap there. Or maybe they aren't
watching the TV coverage !

geoff
Out Cider
2019-07-31 15:04:36 UTC
Reply
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Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF
or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation
to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a
tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying
line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's
skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when
the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly
dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall
leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Probably not, but I completely enjoyed the race.

I really don't want Bernie's sprinklers to be installed, but as the race
was held in variable conditions, the best drivers and teams in those
specific rare conditions came to the top. I very much appreciate what
Kvyat did, I very much lament that Bottas screwed up the one race where
he could have got lots and lots of points to show he's still a title
contender, and I very much appreciated what Kimi did: being 3rd after
the start and even being 2nd at one point of the race, and finishing 7th
after an almost perfect race. There was so much happening all the time I
couldn't even make tea lest I'd miss something important.
--
OutCider
Yuhler Speertraeger
2019-07-31 16:12:16 UTC
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Post by Out Cider
Post by larkim
I'm all for drivers showing their abilities in different weather
conditions, but when it's a lottery in terms of changing weather,
safety car deployment times, micro-errors which either result in a DNF
or no issue at all, etc etc it doesn't really inspire me in relation
to F1.
Yes, it's breathless and keeps you glued to watching, but it's like a
tabloid version of F1.
A full wet race, start to finish, or even a wet start with a drying
line that remains so to the end of the race, shows off a driver's
skills in terms of being able to cope with mixed conditions, but when
the timing of whether you are on the right tyres or not is so highly
dependent on a myriad of safety car deployments etc, it just overall
leaves me cold.
Am I the only one?
Probably not, but I completely enjoyed the race.
I really don't want Bernie's sprinklers to be installed, but as the race
was held in variable conditions, the best drivers and teams in those
specific rare conditions came to the top. I very much appreciate what
Kvyat did, I very much lament that Bottas screwed up the one race where
he could have got lots and lots of points to show he's still a title
contender, and I very much appreciated what Kimi did: being 3rd after
the start and even being 2nd at one point of the race, and finishing 7th
after an almost perfect race. There was so much happening all the time I
couldn't even make tea lest I'd miss something important.
Ha! Just said something like it above. :)
--
Best,
Yuhler

Reply-To: partially ROT13, invalid=com
Due to spam I'm filtering-out GoogleGroups. Sorry. :(
Bigbird
2019-08-01 04:56:15 UTC
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Post by Out Cider
I very much appreciated what Kimi
did: being 3rd after the start
With a liitle help, reportedly.
Post by Out Cider
and even being 2nd at one point of the
race, and finishing 7th after an almost perfect race.
12th.
Post by Out Cider
There was so
much happening all the time I couldn't even make tea lest I'd miss
something important.
Like post race penalties ;)
--
Trump fact check:
5,000 false claims in the first 117 weeks.
Pretending that doesn't bother you is a mental disorder.
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