Discussion:
OT - How?? A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning
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a425couple
2019-06-10 16:26:20 UTC
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from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html

(How did this happen? I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator. How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to the
riders head?)

A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN

Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.

The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.

@FHPOrlando
This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.

180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Dan the Man
2019-06-10 16:34:12 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen? I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator. How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to the
riders head?)
A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN
Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.
The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.
@FHPOrlando
This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.
180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Back in the late 70's, I was in a South Florida park when lightning struck a palm tree during a shower. The tree caught fire like the Olympic torch. THAT was exciting!

I suspect Florida sees a lot of deadly strikes partly because it's flat - few hills or mountains to absorb the strikes.
geoff
2019-06-10 22:21:58 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen?  I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator.  How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to  the
riders head?)
Not an insulator when you are talking about tens of thousands of volts !

geoff
Heron
2019-06-10 22:33:40 UTC
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Post by geoff
Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen?  I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator.  How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to  the
riders head?)
Not an insulator when you are talking about tens of thousands of volts !
geoff
More like millions than thousands.
Willsy
2019-06-11 10:58:46 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen? I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator. How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to the
riders head?)
A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN
Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.
The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.
@FHPOrlando
This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.
180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Not an insulator. Just very very very high resistance. But seeing as a lightning
bolt can exceed a million volts, it'll pass through it easily. Remember, air
itself is an insulator. If you have an electrical circuit and cut the power
wire (introducing an air gap) it stops working right? But since ligtning
has such tremendous potential difference (relative to earth) it can use
the air itself as a conductor. It just wants to 'go to earth' to cancel itself
out.

Also, if the tyres were wet/damp then resistance would massively reduced.
larkim
2019-06-11 15:56:19 UTC
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Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen? I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator. How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to the
riders head?)
A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN
Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.
The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.
@FHPOrlando
This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.
180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Strictly speak it sounds like he was killed by the crash rather than the
lightning itself.

Car drivers, of course, are protected by virtue of the car being a
Faraday cage, if my GCSE physics memory is correct?
Heron
2019-06-11 19:25:44 UTC
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Post by larkim
Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen? I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator. How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to the
riders head?)
A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN
Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.
The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.
@FHPOrlando
This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.
180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Strictly speak it sounds like he was killed by the crash rather than the
lightning itself.
Car drivers, of course, are protected by virtue of the car being a
Faraday cage, if my GCSE physics memory is correct?
No, car windows are much too large to establish
a faraday cage. Go back to school and try again.
larkim
2019-06-11 20:14:54 UTC
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I think they would throw me out.

Ah well...
t***@gmail.com
2019-06-11 22:48:06 UTC
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Post by Heron
Go back to school and try again.
Give it a rest, cunthole.
~misfit~
2019-06-11 23:59:56 UTC
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Post by larkim
Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen? I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator. How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to the
riders head?)
A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN
Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.
The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.
@FHPOrlando
This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.
180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Strictly speak it sounds like he was killed by the crash rather than the
lightning itself.
Car drivers, of course, are protected by virtue of the car being a
Faraday cage, if my GCSE physics memory is correct?
It's not so much a Faraday cage as a better, much more conductive path to earth.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM"
David Melville

This is not an email and hasn't been checked for viruses by any half-arsed self-promoting software.
t***@gmail.com
2019-06-12 00:41:14 UTC
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Post by ~misfit~
It's not so much a Faraday cage as a better, much more conductive path to earth.
Yes, with your never ending bad luck,
you will stuck by lightning,
if you step outside that shithole.
keithr0
2019-06-12 23:17:57 UTC
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Post by ~misfit~
Post by larkim
Post by a425couple
from
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/us/motorcyclist-killed-lightning-florida-trnd/index.html
(How did this happen?  I thought the rubber in tires was an
insulator.  How did the 'electrical charge' from the ground
go up through the tires to the motorcycle, and up to  the
riders head?)
A motorcyclist is killed by a bolt of lightning in Florida
By Scottie Andrew and Saeed Ahmed, CNN
Updated 9:56 AM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
The victim's helmet
The victim's helmet
(CNN)A man was killed after he was struck by lightning while riding his
motorcycle in northeast Florida.
The 45-year-old man was traveling south on Interstate 95 around 2 p.m.
Sunday when he was struck, the Florida Highway Patrol reported.
Lightning shattered the cyclist's helmet, officials said. He swerved
into the median and was thrown from the vehicle.
Authorities haven't identified the man, from Charlotte, North Carolina.
He died at the scene.
The department tweeted a photo of the man's helmet, punctured by the strike.
@FHPOrlando
   This is what’s left of a 45 year old man’s helmet after he was struck
by lightning, while riding his motorcycle southbound, on I-95 in Volusia
County this afternoon. Unfortunately he did not survive the crash.
180
3:06 PM - Jun 9, 2019
267 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Lightning killed 47 people in Florida between 2008 and 2017, the highest
number of fatalities of any state. Widely considered the lightning
capital of the U.S. for its sheer density of flashes, the state's heat,
humidity and sea breezes from its dual coasts make severe weather events
more likely.
Strictly speak it sounds like he was killed by the crash rather than the
lightning itself.
Car drivers, of course, are protected by virtue of the car being a
Faraday cage, if my GCSE physics memory is correct?
It's not so much a Faraday cage as a better, much more conductive path to earth.
Scary experience - sitting on a catamaran becalmed in the middle of a
lake with a thunderstorm rolling in looking at the 21 foot aluminium
mast/lightning conductor.

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