Discussion:
Clark The Monza Master, Monza — 10 Sept. 1967
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a425couple
2019-06-24 02:04:49 UTC
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The Monza Master
Monza — 10 Sept. 1967

The 1967 Grand Prix of Italy at Monza is considered by many to be one of
the best Formula One races in history. It was perhaps also the finest
drive of Scotsman Jim Clark’s F1 career. The irony is that Clark didn’t
even win the race. With Clark’s Lotus starting from pole position, Jack
Brabham took the lead at the green flag, but on the 2nd lap Dan Gurney
went ahead followed by Graham Hill, Clark, Bruce McLaren, Jackie Stewart
and Denny Hulme. By the end of the 3rd lap on the fast, pre-chicane
Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Clark was in the lead, and for a dozen or
so laps drove his classically consistent, smooth style to stretch out a
good-sized lead. But on lap 14, disaster loomed.
One of Clark’s rear tires had a cut and needed to be replaced. He lost
an entire lap while having the wheel changed in the pits, and the
Scotsman found himself a lap behind the leaders in 15th place out of 18
starters. Rejoining the race, Clark ripped back through the field,
progressively lowering the circuit record and eventually equalling his
pole time of 1m 28.5s. Clark—Monza 1967Clark pushed his Lotus 49/3 to
the edge, squaring up to pass the third-placed Surtees when Hill went
out on lap 59 with an engine failure. Clark thus moved into 2nd and
gradually caught Brabham and took the lead — having made up a complete
lap. But it was not yet over, and with two broken Ford-Cosworth V8
engines already in the pits, Lotus team boss Colin Chapman had his
fingers crossed. On the final lap, the three cars of Clark, Brabham and
Surtees went into the awesome Curva Grande one behind the other when
suddenly Clark’s engine cut out, which caused the car to twitch
sideways. This forced Surtees and Brabham to do a lightning quick dodge
round the Lotus, demonstrating why Grand Prix drivers are supremely
skilled. On the final lap, the Cosworth strained for a last few drops of
gasoline. Clark pummeled his red steering wheel in frustration as the
low-slung, green and yellow Lotus coasted slowly toward the finish line.
He was ahead of Brabham and John Surtees starting the lap, but the car
had not been filled with enough fuel for such a performance. When the
tumult and the shouting died down, which was nearly two hours later, the
Lotus mechanics found that there still had been 11 liters left the fuel
tanks in Clark’s Lotus, so he had not run out of fuel, rather the pumps
had failed to pick up the last drops. After all was said and done, there
had been a total of 12 lead changes in the race. Just as it is rare for
one to see that many lead changes during a race today, it was a
remarkably competitive race even then. Surtees won, which proved to be
Honda’s first and last victory under the 3.0 liter engine formula used
in F1 starting in 1966. Jim Clark’s car gently rolled past the line
shortly thereafter, just a bit short of what could have been the
greatest victory of his career. A truely astonishing performance not
seen since the days of Nuvolari, Fangio or Moss.
~misfit~
2019-06-24 02:18:32 UTC
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Post by a425couple
The Monza Master
Monza — 10 Sept. 1967
The 1967 Grand Prix of Italy at Monza is considered by many to be one of the best Formula One races
in history. It was perhaps also the finest drive of Scotsman Jim Clark’s F1 career. The irony is
that Clark didn’t even win the race. With Clark’s Lotus starting from pole position, Jack Brabham
took the lead at the green flag, but on the 2nd lap Dan Gurney went ahead followed by Graham Hill,
Clark, Bruce McLaren, Jackie Stewart and Denny Hulme. By the end of the 3rd lap on the fast,
pre-chicane Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Clark was in the lead, and for a dozen or so laps drove
his classically consistent, smooth style to stretch out a good-sized lead. But on lap 14, disaster
loomed.
One of Clark’s rear tires had a cut and needed to be replaced. He lost an entire lap while having
the wheel changed in the pits, and the Scotsman found himself a lap behind the leaders in 15th
place out of 18 starters. Rejoining the race, Clark ripped back through the field, progressively
lowering the circuit record and eventually equalling his pole time of 1m 28.5s. Clark—Monza
1967Clark pushed his Lotus 49/3 to the edge, squaring up to pass the third-placed Surtees when Hill
went out on lap 59 with an engine failure. Clark thus moved into 2nd and gradually caught Brabham
and took the lead — having made up a complete lap. But it was not yet over, and with two broken
Ford-Cosworth V8 engines already in the pits, Lotus team boss Colin Chapman had his fingers
crossed. On the final lap, the three cars of Clark, Brabham and Surtees went into the awesome Curva
Grande one behind the other when suddenly Clark’s engine cut out, which caused the car to twitch
sideways. This forced Surtees and Brabham to do a lightning quick dodge round the Lotus,
demonstrating why Grand Prix drivers are supremely skilled. On the final lap, the Cosworth strained
for a last few drops of gasoline. Clark pummeled his red steering wheel in frustration as the
low-slung, green and yellow Lotus coasted slowly toward the finish line. He was ahead of Brabham
and John Surtees starting the lap, but the car had not been filled with enough fuel for such a
performance. When the tumult and the shouting died down, which was nearly two hours later, the
Lotus mechanics found that there still had been 11 liters left the fuel tanks in Clark’s Lotus, so
he had not run out of fuel, rather the pumps had failed to pick up the last drops. After all was
said and done, there had been a total of 12 lead changes in the race. Just as it is rare for one to
see that many lead changes during a race today, it was a remarkably competitive race even then.
Surtees won, which proved to be Honda’s first and last victory under the 3.0 liter engine formula
used in F1 starting in 1966. Jim Clark’s car gently rolled past the line shortly thereafter, just a
bit short of what could have been the greatest victory of his career. A truely astonishing
performance not seen since the days of Nuvolari, Fangio or Moss.
Ahh yes the good old days when on average one driver died to a crash in any given year. It brings a
tear to my eye....
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy little classification
in the DSM"
David Melville

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