Discussion:
What's wrong with the USA's great new circuit?
Add Reply
bra
2018-04-21 17:25:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Is it a case of brilliant design and cheap construction, or is the terrain 'incompetent' as soil engineers say?

Both Hamilton and Rossi have praised the circuit design, but:

https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/135519/rossi-leads-furious-criticism-of-austin-track-work
Dan the Man
2018-04-22 01:57:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bra
Is it a case of brilliant design and cheap construction, or is the terrain 'incompetent' as soil engineers say?
https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/135519/rossi-leads-furious-criticism-of-austin-track-work
Sounds like it's due for repaving, at the least. I hope those bikers are wearing cups...
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-22 14:31:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dan the Man
I hope those bikers are wearing cups...
Why are you concerned for the well being of their genitals?
Bobster
2018-04-22 07:19:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bra
Is it a case of brilliant design and cheap construction, or is the terrain 'incompetent' as soil engineers say?
https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/135519/rossi-leads-furious-criticism-of-austin-track-work
The track surface was ground recently, ahead of the MotoGP event, after complaints from MotoGP last year. I would think a lot of the debris that's being complained about was caused by the grinding.

In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is that the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
News
2018-04-22 13:43:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobster
Post by bra
Is it a case of brilliant design and cheap construction, or is the terrain 'incompetent' as soil engineers say?
https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/135519/rossi-leads-furious-criticism-of-austin-track-work
The track surface was ground recently, ahead of the MotoGP event, after complaints from MotoGP last year. I would think a lot of the debris that's being complained about was caused by the grinding.
In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is that the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..

They're just grinding the tops off the heaving. COTA will keep on
heaving until the track foundation is properly treated and repaved.
Bobster
2018-04-22 17:57:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
Texas is big. Very big. Bigger than France. People don't generalise about French soils because there isn't one such thing as a French soil.

Same with Texas. Conditions will vary across the state.

I moved house 6 years ago. We moved about 10km as the crow flies. Different soil. Lots of clay where we used to be, darker, more crumbly soil where we used to be.
News
2018-04-22 19:04:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobster
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
Texas is big. Very big. Bigger than France. People don't generalise about French soils because there isn't one such thing as a French soil.
Same with Texas. Conditions will vary across the state.
I moved house 6 years ago. We moved about 10km as the crow flies. Different soil. Lots of clay where we used to be, darker, more crumbly soil where we used to be.
Really? Well, pardner, I lived in Texas and am quite familiar with the
Austin area.

COTA is built in a region of surface clays, and while the developers
claim to have modified the soil during (rushed) construction, the
continuing heaving says they're full of Texas cow chips.
Bobster
2018-04-22 19:47:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by News
Post by Bobster
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
Texas is big. Very big. Bigger than France. People don't generalise about French soils because there isn't one such thing as a French soil.
Same with Texas. Conditions will vary across the state.
I moved house 6 years ago. We moved about 10km as the crow flies. Different soil. Lots of clay where we used to be, darker, more crumbly soil where we used to be.
Really?
Yes.
Post by News
Well, pardner, I lived in Texas
That's like me saying I live in South Africa. Which I do. But South Africa and Texas are big places, very different from one end to the other.
Post by News
and am quite familiar with the
Austin area.
And you believe there's such a thing as "Texas soil" when the geology of Austin itself is split because the city straddles a fault line?
Post by News
COTA is built in a region of surface clays, and while the developers
claim to have modified the soil during (rushed) construction, the
continuing heaving says they're full of Texas cow chips.
News
2018-04-22 21:42:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobster
Post by News
Post by Bobster
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
Texas is big. Very big. Bigger than France. People don't generalise about French soils because there isn't one such thing as a French soil.
Same with Texas. Conditions will vary across the state.
I moved house 6 years ago. We moved about 10km as the crow flies. Different soil. Lots of clay where we used to be, darker, more crumbly soil where we used to be.
Really?
Yes.
Post by News
Well, pardner, I lived in Texas
That's like me saying I live in South Africa. Which I do. But South Africa and Texas are big places, very different from one end to the other.
Post by News
and am quite familiar with the
Austin area.
And you believe there's such a thing as "Texas soil" when the geology of Austin itself is split because the city straddles a fault line?
Post by News
COTA is built in a region of surface clays, and while the developers
claim to have modified the soil during (rushed) construction, the
continuing heaving says they're full of Texas cow chips.
Please let us know when you decide to cease embarrassing yourself.
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-23 05:20:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by News
Please let us know when you decide to cease embarrassing yourself.
When you say 'us'.
Do you mean fucking idiots?
M2T
2018-04-22 22:53:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobster
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
Texas is big. Very big. Bigger than France. People don't generalise about French soils because there isn't one such thing as a French soil.
Same with Texas. Conditions will vary across the state.
I moved house 6 years ago. We moved about 10km as the crow flies. Different soil. Lots of clay where we used to be, darker, more crumbly soil where we used to be.
The Circuit of Americas is built on 2 soils - alluvium and clay, neither
of which are stable.
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-23 04:48:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
neither of which are stable.
Like your relationship with your gay lover.
bra
2018-04-23 15:20:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
They're just grinding the tops off the heaving. COTA will keep on
heaving until the track foundation is properly treated and repaved.
Thanks, News. People tend to ignore what's underneath everything.
My town hall is on a grassed hill that seeps groundwater from the lower slope, onto a lower road and sidewalk. For the last 34 years that I've lived here, I have watched them year by year draining, paving, resurfacing, re-routing, planting, over and over.

It's where the water comes out, and water goes downhill. No good telling the town officials, though! They'll be doing this in a hundred years time.
Dan the Man
2018-04-24 16:36:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bra
Post by News
Texas soils have high clay and sulfate mineral (typically, gypsum)
content, are expansive and make very poor foundation material.
Typically, ionic stabilizers such as lime are worked into them in order
to reduce the swell potential of active swelling clay soils. Left
untreated, active swelling clays cause heaving, distress and cracking in
foundations, concrete floor slabs, roads, highways, railways, etc..
They're just grinding the tops off the heaving. COTA will keep on
heaving until the track foundation is properly treated and repaved.
Thanks, News. People tend to ignore what's underneath everything.
My town hall is on a grassed hill that seeps groundwater from the lower slope, onto a lower road and sidewalk. For the last 34 years that I've lived here, I have watched them year by year draining, paving, resurfacing, re-routing, planting, over and over.
It's where the water comes out, and water goes downhill. No good telling the town officials, though! They'll be doing this in a hundred years time.
Sounds like job security for the local landscapers.

Bigbird
2018-04-22 16:31:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobster
Post by bra
Is it a case of brilliant design and cheap construction, or is the
terrain 'incompetent' as soil engineers say?
https://www.autosport.com/motogp/news/135519/rossi-leads-furious-criticism-of-austin-track-work
Post by Bobster
The track surface was ground recently, ahead of the MotoGP event,
after complaints from MotoGP last year. I would think a lot of the
debris that's being complained about was caused by the grinding.
In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is that
the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
...under braking.
Mark Jackson
2018-04-22 18:15:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bigbird
Post by Bobster
In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is
that the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
...under braking.
With no aero downforce the bikes start braking where the F1 cars are
still going full speed.
--
Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
This quote is often falsely attributed to Mark Twain.
- Randall Munroe
DumbedDownUSA
2018-04-22 20:05:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Jackson
Post by Bigbird
Post by Bobster
In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is
that the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
...under braking.
With no aero downforce the bikes start braking where the F1 cars are
still going full speed.
I don't see why there would be much rippling except in the (F1) braking
area.
--
Trump averages six falsehoods a day; how you doin'?
Moderate! an unwitting, ignorant, cowardly, racist, homophobic, latrine
cleaning mawine.
Dense, if you are reading this you lied.
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-23 05:01:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DumbedDownUSA
I don't see why there would be much rippling except in the (F1) braking
area.
You don't see why, from where?
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-23 05:05:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by DumbedDownUSA
I don't see why
LOL. Logoff brain dead
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-23 05:14:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, April 22, 2018 at 2:05:25 PM UTC-6, DumbedDownUSA wrote:

Fuck you.
And your sig.
Delete it.
You gay ass homosexual.
Post by DumbedDownUSA
Trump averages six falsehoods a day; how you doin'?
Moderate! an unwitting, ignorant, cowardly, racist, homophobic, latrine
cleaning mawine.
Dense, if you are reading this you lied.
t***@gmail.com
2018-04-23 04:55:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bigbird
...under braking.
Hi fuckhead.
Are you capable of forming a sentence?
bra
2018-04-23 15:23:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bigbird
Post by Bobster
In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is that
the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
...under braking.
Coincidentally (I just replied to News, re my town), we have a 21% grade street that ends in a stop sign at a junction --- the bottom fifty feet ripple just like that.
News
2018-04-23 15:42:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bra
Post by Bigbird
Post by Bobster
In some quarters the problem is blamed on F1. The suggestion is that
the high down force of F1 cars creates ripples in the tarmac.
...under braking.
Coincidentally (I just replied to News, re my town), we have a 21% grade street that ends in a stop sign at a junction --- the bottom fifty feet ripple just like that.
That's due to:

1./ heaving beneath loosening the pavement surface, and
2./ braking forces shifting the pavement laterally.
bra
2018-04-23 19:14:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by News
1./ heaving beneath loosening the pavement surface, and
2./ braking forces shifting the pavement laterally.
A colleague who was a geological mining engr was visiting a copper mine when the site super mentioned that his haul trucks were burning out their electric motors at a high rate. (I think some mfrs have now dropped electric powertrains?).

My colleague set up a canvas chair by the haul road from the pit, and spent a morning watching and taking photos.

The truck front wheels were pushing a running gravel "wave" as they came up slope with --- the road had been badly laid (I am no expert at all), the truck's were fighting against gravity AND deep gravel.
News
2018-04-23 19:38:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by bra
Post by News
1./ heaving beneath loosening the pavement surface, and
2./ braking forces shifting the pavement laterally.
A colleague who was a geological mining engr was visiting a copper mine when the site super mentioned that his haul trucks were burning out their electric motors at a high rate. (I think some mfrs have now dropped electric powertrains?).
My colleague set up a canvas chair by the haul road from the pit, and spent a morning watching and taking photos.
The truck front wheels were pushing a running gravel "wave" as they came up slope with --- the road had been badly laid (I am no expert at all), the truck's were fighting against gravity AND deep gravel.
There ya go... Peristalsis by mining haul truck.
bra
2018-04-23 20:00:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by News
Post by bra
Post by News
1./ heaving beneath loosening the pavement surface, and
2./ braking forces shifting the pavement laterally.
A colleague who was a geological mining engr was visiting a copper mine when the site super mentioned that his haul trucks were burning out their electric motors at a high rate. (I think some mfrs have now dropped electric powertrains?).
The truck front wheels were pushing a running gravel "wave" as they came up slope with --- the road had been badly laid (I am no expert at all), the truck's were fighting against gravity AND deep gravel.
There ya go... Peristalsis by mining haul truck.
Ouch --- that wins Metaphor Of The Week ;-)
Loading...