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Mario @ 200 mph
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2017-05-26 01:18:44 UTC
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Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/

If you were offered a private tour of the moon with say, Buzz Aldrin,
would you take it? The equivalent for motorsports fans is what the Indy
Racing Experience is offering May 29, the day after the 101st running of
the Indianapolis 500. Thirty select people will ride along with Mario
Andretti in a two-seat Indy car for a few hot laps at, gulp, over 200 mph.

Why liken this to a moon shot with Aldrin? Because you get to check all
the boxes: Mario Andretti, the "Driver of the Century," as your
chauffeur; the most famous track in the world, Indianapolis Motor
Speedway, as your venue; and the magic number, 200 mph, as your speed.

Last year, IRE quietly inaugurated its “200 MPH Club” and, by word off
mouth, sold seats out way in advance of the event. At press time, Shonda
Kennedy, marketing manager of IRE, confirmed that 22 seats have already
been booked this year.

“This is the tops,” said Vicki Mullis, a race fan whose bucket-list
dream was to hit 200 mph. “It’s one of those things you wish for, but
don’t think will ever come true.”

I can tell you personally, having participated as a ride-along last year
and reported on it, that the $3,300 experience is worth every penny.
Here's how it went down for me.

Upon meeting my 32 fellow ride-alongs, I was fitted in a fireproof
driving suit and crash helmet, signed the customary waivers and posed
for photos with Mario. When my name was called, I was belted snugly into
the second seat with a five-point harness.

After a warm-up lap to heat the tires, Andretti gunned the engine. By
the time we were in the short chute between turns 1 and 2, the car was
already above 140 mph. As our speed increased, I began to feel the G
forces crush my body against the right side of the car.

Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200 mph program receives a
special ring to commemorate their induction into IRE's 200 mph club. Jim
Clash
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200-mph program received a
special ring to commemorate induction into IRE's "200 MPH Club."

On the back straight we accelerated to over 180 mph, and I braced for
turns 3 and 4 where many accidents have occurred, some fatal including
Gordon Smiley in 1982 and Tony Renna in 2003. Teeth chattering, my
helmet felt like it was about to fly off from the hurricane-force wind
in the open-cockpit car as we dove down and hugged the white line at the
inside of the track. After exiting turn 4 a foot from the retaining
wall, we flashed down the front straight and across the famous yard of
bricks - at 202 mph!

After another few laps around the 2.5-mile oval, we pulled back into pit
lane. The entire ride, 10 miles, was over in a flash and had taken less
than four minutes!

“Mario Andretti has been my favorite driver since I was 7," said Jerry
Day, a minister from Columbus, OH. "It was like nothing I’ve ever
experienced. Crazy. I couldn’t hold my head straight, the Gs were so
amazing. I can’t believe those guys can do that for 500 miles.”

“It was more than I’d ever imagined, worth every $1,100 per minute,"
said Chuck Mitchell, a lighting and controls entrepreneur from San
Diego, CA. "Extremely fast. I was afraid in the first of couple turns we
were going into the wall.”

For his part Andretti, 77, was elated, too. “I was really pushing it out
there,” he said. “I’m passionate. I love the driving and to showcase the
sport. We are not just giving rides. I’m pressing certain limits out there.”

After our rides, participants were given a commemorative ring and a
certificate signed by Andretti, then treated to a fancy dinner. It was
all done professionally - and safely. To reserve a spot for this year's
program in May, contact IRE. Only a few seats remain, so don’t wait too
long.
Martin Harran
2017-05-28 06:38:03 UTC
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Post by .
Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/
If you were offered a private tour of the moon with say, Buzz Aldrin,
would you take it? The equivalent for motorsports fans is what the Indy
Racing Experience is offering May 29, the day after the 101st running of
the Indianapolis 500. Thirty select people will ride along with Mario
Andretti in a two-seat Indy car for a few hot laps at, gulp, over 200 mph.
Why liken this to a moon shot with Aldrin? Because you get to check all
the boxes: Mario Andretti, the "Driver of the Century," as your
chauffeur; the most famous track in the world, Indianapolis Motor
Speedway, as your venue; and the magic number, 200 mph, as your speed.
Last year, IRE quietly inaugurated its “200 MPH Club” and, by word off
mouth, sold seats out way in advance of the event. At press time, Shonda
Kennedy, marketing manager of IRE, confirmed that 22 seats have already
been booked this year.
“This is the tops,” said Vicki Mullis, a race fan whose bucket-list
dream was to hit 200 mph. “It’s one of those things you wish for, but
don’t think will ever come true.”
I can tell you personally, having participated as a ride-along last year
and reported on it, that the $3,300 experience is worth every penny.
Here's how it went down for me.
Upon meeting my 32 fellow ride-alongs, I was fitted in a fireproof
driving suit and crash helmet, signed the customary waivers and posed
for photos with Mario. When my name was called, I was belted snugly into
the second seat with a five-point harness.
After a warm-up lap to heat the tires, Andretti gunned the engine. By
the time we were in the short chute between turns 1 and 2, the car was
already above 140 mph. As our speed increased, I began to feel the G
forces crush my body against the right side of the car.
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200 mph program receives a
special ring to commemorate their induction into IRE's 200 mph club. Jim
Clash
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200-mph program received a
special ring to commemorate induction into IRE's "200 MPH Club."
On the back straight we accelerated to over 180 mph, and I braced for
turns 3 and 4 where many accidents have occurred, some fatal including
Gordon Smiley in 1982 and Tony Renna in 2003. Teeth chattering, my
helmet felt like it was about to fly off from the hurricane-force wind
in the open-cockpit car as we dove down and hugged the white line at the
inside of the track. After exiting turn 4 a foot from the retaining
wall, we flashed down the front straight and across the famous yard of
bricks - at 202 mph!
After another few laps around the 2.5-mile oval, we pulled back into pit
lane. The entire ride, 10 miles, was over in a flash and had taken less
than four minutes!
“Mario Andretti has been my favorite driver since I was 7," said Jerry
Day, a minister from Columbus, OH. "It was like nothing I’ve ever
experienced. Crazy. I couldn’t hold my head straight, the Gs were so
amazing. I can’t believe those guys can do that for 500 miles.”
“It was more than I’d ever imagined, worth every $1,100 per minute,"
said Chuck Mitchell, a lighting and controls entrepreneur from San
Diego, CA. "Extremely fast. I was afraid in the first of couple turns we
were going into the wall.”
For his part Andretti, 77, was elated, too. “I was really pushing it out
there,” he said. “I’m passionate. I love the driving and to showcase the
sport. We are not just giving rides. I’m pressing certain limits out there.”
After our rides, participants were given a commemorative ring and a
certificate signed by Andretti, then treated to a fancy dinner. It was
all done professionally - and safely. To reserve a spot for this year's
program in May, contact IRE. Only a few seats remain, so don’t wait too
long.
200 mph with a 77 year old driver - madness, utter madness but I would
jump at the chance of it tomorrow!
~misfit~
2017-05-28 06:53:09 UTC
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Post by Martin Harran
Post by .
Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/
If you were offered a private tour of the moon with say, Buzz Aldrin,
would you take it? The equivalent for motorsports fans is what the
Indy Racing Experience is offering May 29, the day after the 101st
running of the Indianapolis 500. Thirty select people will ride
along with Mario Andretti in a two-seat Indy car for a few hot laps
at, gulp, over 200 mph.
Why liken this to a moon shot with Aldrin? Because you get to check all
the boxes: Mario Andretti, the "Driver of the Century," as your
chauffeur; the most famous track in the world, Indianapolis Motor
Speedway, as your venue; and the magic number, 200 mph, as your speed.
Last year, IRE quietly inaugurated its "200 MPH Club" and, by word
off mouth, sold seats out way in advance of the event. At press
time, Shonda Kennedy, marketing manager of IRE, confirmed that 22
seats have already been booked this year.
"This is the tops," said Vicki Mullis, a race fan whose bucket-list
dream was to hit 200 mph. "It's one of those things you wish for, but
don't think will ever come true."
I can tell you personally, having participated as a ride-along last
year and reported on it, that the $3,300 experience is worth every
penny.
Here's how it went down for me.
Upon meeting my 32 fellow ride-alongs, I was fitted in a fireproof
driving suit and crash helmet, signed the customary waivers and posed
for photos with Mario. When my name was called, I was belted snugly
into the second seat with a five-point harness.
After a warm-up lap to heat the tires, Andretti gunned the engine. By
the time we were in the short chute between turns 1 and 2, the car
was already above 140 mph. As our speed increased, I began to feel
the G
forces crush my body against the right side of the car.
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200 mph program receives a
special ring to commemorate their induction into IRE's 200 mph club.
Jim Clash
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200-mph program received a
special ring to commemorate induction into IRE's "200 MPH Club."
On the back straight we accelerated to over 180 mph, and I braced for
turns 3 and 4 where many accidents have occurred, some fatal
including Gordon Smiley in 1982 and Tony Renna in 2003. Teeth
chattering, my
helmet felt like it was about to fly off from the hurricane-force wind
in the open-cockpit car as we dove down and hugged the white line at
the inside of the track. After exiting turn 4 a foot from the
retaining
wall, we flashed down the front straight and across the famous yard
of bricks - at 202 mph!
After another few laps around the 2.5-mile oval, we pulled back into
pit lane. The entire ride, 10 miles, was over in a flash and had
taken less than four minutes!
"Mario Andretti has been my favorite driver since I was 7," said
Jerry
Day, a minister from Columbus, OH. "It was like nothing I've ever
experienced. Crazy. I couldn't hold my head straight, the Gs were so
amazing. I can't believe those guys can do that for 500 miles."
"It was more than I'd ever imagined, worth every $1,100 per minute,"
said Chuck Mitchell, a lighting and controls entrepreneur from San
Diego, CA. "Extremely fast. I was afraid in the first of couple
turns we were going into the wall."
For his part Andretti, 77, was elated, too. "I was really pushing it
out there," he said. "I'm passionate. I love the driving and to
showcase the sport. We are not just giving rides. I'm pressing
certain limits out there."
After our rides, participants were given a commemorative ring and a
certificate signed by Andretti, then treated to a fancy dinner. It was
all done professionally - and safely. To reserve a spot for this
year's program in May, contact IRE. Only a few seats remain, so
don't wait too long.
200 mph with a 77 year old driver - madness, utter madness but I would
jump at the chance of it tomorrow!
As far as I know they're still taking bookings - jump! Oh that's right,
tomorrow never comes. ;)

I wouldn't - I've never been a good passenger. However I'd jump at the
chance of driving say 10 laps with a shot at going 200 mph. I've exceeded
150 mph on both two wheels and four but have never had enough road and/or
power to get to 200.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)
Martin Harran
2017-05-28 10:56:23 UTC
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On Sun, 28 May 2017 18:53:09 +1200, "~misfit~"
Post by ~misfit~
Post by Martin Harran
Post by .
Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/
If you were offered a private tour of the moon with say, Buzz Aldrin,
would you take it? The equivalent for motorsports fans is what the
Indy Racing Experience is offering May 29, the day after the 101st
running of the Indianapolis 500. Thirty select people will ride
along with Mario Andretti in a two-seat Indy car for a few hot laps
at, gulp, over 200 mph.
Why liken this to a moon shot with Aldrin? Because you get to check all
the boxes: Mario Andretti, the "Driver of the Century," as your
chauffeur; the most famous track in the world, Indianapolis Motor
Speedway, as your venue; and the magic number, 200 mph, as your speed.
Last year, IRE quietly inaugurated its "200 MPH Club" and, by word
off mouth, sold seats out way in advance of the event. At press
time, Shonda Kennedy, marketing manager of IRE, confirmed that 22
seats have already been booked this year.
"This is the tops," said Vicki Mullis, a race fan whose bucket-list
dream was to hit 200 mph. "It's one of those things you wish for, but
don't think will ever come true."
I can tell you personally, having participated as a ride-along last
year and reported on it, that the $3,300 experience is worth every
penny.
Here's how it went down for me.
Upon meeting my 32 fellow ride-alongs, I was fitted in a fireproof
driving suit and crash helmet, signed the customary waivers and posed
for photos with Mario. When my name was called, I was belted snugly
into the second seat with a five-point harness.
After a warm-up lap to heat the tires, Andretti gunned the engine. By
the time we were in the short chute between turns 1 and 2, the car
was already above 140 mph. As our speed increased, I began to feel
the G
forces crush my body against the right side of the car.
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200 mph program receives a
special ring to commemorate their induction into IRE's 200 mph club.
Jim Clash
Each participant in the Mario Andretti 200-mph program received a
special ring to commemorate induction into IRE's "200 MPH Club."
On the back straight we accelerated to over 180 mph, and I braced for
turns 3 and 4 where many accidents have occurred, some fatal
including Gordon Smiley in 1982 and Tony Renna in 2003. Teeth
chattering, my
helmet felt like it was about to fly off from the hurricane-force wind
in the open-cockpit car as we dove down and hugged the white line at
the inside of the track. After exiting turn 4 a foot from the
retaining
wall, we flashed down the front straight and across the famous yard
of bricks - at 202 mph!
After another few laps around the 2.5-mile oval, we pulled back into
pit lane. The entire ride, 10 miles, was over in a flash and had
taken less than four minutes!
"Mario Andretti has been my favorite driver since I was 7," said
Jerry
Day, a minister from Columbus, OH. "It was like nothing I've ever
experienced. Crazy. I couldn't hold my head straight, the Gs were so
amazing. I can't believe those guys can do that for 500 miles."
"It was more than I'd ever imagined, worth every $1,100 per minute,"
said Chuck Mitchell, a lighting and controls entrepreneur from San
Diego, CA. "Extremely fast. I was afraid in the first of couple
turns we were going into the wall."
For his part Andretti, 77, was elated, too. "I was really pushing it
out there," he said. "I'm passionate. I love the driving and to
showcase the sport. We are not just giving rides. I'm pressing
certain limits out there."
After our rides, participants were given a commemorative ring and a
certificate signed by Andretti, then treated to a fancy dinner. It was
all done professionally - and safely. To reserve a spot for this
year's program in May, contact IRE. Only a few seats remain, so
don't wait too long.
200 mph with a 77 year old driver - madness, utter madness but I would
jump at the chance of it tomorrow!
As far as I know they're still taking bookings - jump! Oh that's right,
tomorrow never comes. ;)
I seem to recall one of the UK TV channels a few years ago offering as
a competition prize a similar ride at Silverstone in a specially
constructed 2 seater F1 car but it was explicitly pointed out that the
winner would have to pass a medical/fitness test first. I suspect my
cardiac history would rule me out :(
Post by ~misfit~
I wouldn't - I've never been a good passenger. However I'd jump at the
chance of driving say 10 laps with a shot at going 200 mph. I've exceeded
150 mph on both two wheels and four but have never had enough road and/or
power to get to 200.
a425couple
2017-05-30 21:38:13 UTC
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Post by ~misfit~
Post by Martin Harran
Post by .
Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/
200 mph with a 77 year old driver - madness, utter madness but I would
jump at the chance of it tomorrow!
I wouldn't - I've never been a good passenger. However I'd jump at the
chance of driving say 10 laps with a shot at going 200 mph. I've exceeded
150 mph on both two wheels and four but have never had enough road and/or
power to get to 200.
Why have you never raced autos?
~misfit~
2017-05-31 00:48:43 UTC
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Post by a425couple
Post by ~misfit~
Post by Martin Harran
Post by .
Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/
200 mph with a 77 year old driver - madness, utter madness but I
would jump at the chance of it tomorrow!
I wouldn't - I've never been a good passenger. However I'd jump at
the chance of driving say 10 laps with a shot at going 200 mph. I've
exceeded 150 mph on both two wheels and four but have never had
enough road and/or power to get to 200.
Why have you never raced autos?
Where I grew up there wasn't a culture of motor racing and back then it
wasn't as easy to 'change tack' in life as it is now. I did get offered a
ride to race bikes / sidecars in my late 20s (after a team owner rode
pillion with me on his Ducati SS900 and was impressed by my lines in corners
at 240 kmh) but I've always preferred four wheels, I'd just started a new
job and had depleted my savings (and there was no guaranteed income from the
ride) and would have had to move across country to a town where I'd never
been before and knew nobody.

Historically most non-affluent drivers started off because either their
fathers / family were in the motor / sport business or they lived near race
tracks or go kart facilities etc. I lived right out in the country in NZ
where 'sport' meant rugby or duck shooting and to satisfy my desire to drive
I blatted around the farm on whatever I could; A Fergie 28, an old Morrie
'thou belonging to Dads boss and later a really nice Fiat tractor (640-dt)
which could do over 60 kmh. I'd drive through steep clay bush tracks all
crossed up (the front wheels throwing huge chunks of clay into my lap),
outside rear wheel hanging over large drops... The Fiat had tall gears (2
ratios actually) and was fitted with a foot throttle so was much more fun to
drive than the Fergie.

Here's a youtube vid of some guys messing around with a 540-dt and a 640.
The one I drove had the bigger engine of the 640 and was the 'dt' version
with 4WD and fat tyres (like the 540 dt in the vid). No roof on 'mine', just
a roll-bar.


When I turned 15 and got my licence I had a succession of cheap old cars
that I drove (mostly sideways) on the unsealed roads where I lived. I got
good with bikes as well because (almost) every farm had motorbikes instead
of horses by then so I was riding bikes (as well as driving tractors etc.)
from age 12....
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)
~misfit~
2017-05-31 03:05:53 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by ~misfit~
Post by a425couple
Post by ~misfit~
Post by Martin Harran
Post by .
Calling All Speed Demons: Mario Andretti Will
Take You To 200 MPH At Indy's Famed Track
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimclash/2017/03/31/calling-all-speed-demons-mario-andretti-will-take-you-to-200-mph-at-indy-track-seriously/
200 mph with a 77 year old driver - madness, utter madness but I
would jump at the chance of it tomorrow!
I wouldn't - I've never been a good passenger. However I'd jump at
the chance of driving say 10 laps with a shot at going 200 mph. I've
exceeded 150 mph on both two wheels and four but have never had
enough road and/or power to get to 200.
Why have you never raced autos?
Where I grew up there wasn't a culture of motor racing and back then
it wasn't as easy to 'change tack' in life as it is now. I did get
offered a ride to race bikes / sidecars in my late 20s (after a team
owner rode pillion with me on his Ducati SS900 and was impressed by
my lines in corners at 240 kmh) but I've always preferred four
wheels, I'd just started a new job and had depleted my savings (and
there was no guaranteed income from the ride) and would have had to
move across country to a town where I'd never been before and knew
nobody.
Historically most non-affluent drivers started off because either
their fathers / family were in the motor / sport business or they
lived near race tracks or go kart facilities etc. I lived right out
in the country in NZ where 'sport' meant rugby or duck shooting and
to satisfy my desire to drive I blatted around the farm on whatever I
could; A Fergie 28, an old Morrie 'thou belonging to Dads boss and
later a really nice Fiat tractor (640-dt) which could do over 60 kmh.
I'd drive through steep clay bush tracks all crossed up (the front
wheels throwing huge chunks of clay into my lap), outside rear wheel
hanging over large drops... The Fiat had tall gears (2 ratios
actually) and was fitted with a foot throttle so was much more fun to
drive than the Fergie.
Here's a youtube vid of some guys messing around with a 540-dt and a
640. The one I drove had the bigger engine of the 640 and was the
'dt' version with 4WD and fat tyres (like the 540 dt in the vid). No
roof on 'mine', just a roll-bar. http://youtu.be/4bS1macYCLg
When I turned 15 and got my licence I had a succession of cheap old
cars that I drove (mostly sideways) on the unsealed roads where I
lived. I got good with bikes as well because (almost) every farm had
motorbikes instead of horses by then so I was riding bikes (as well
as driving tractors etc.) from age 12....
Oh, worked in various jobs until I saved enough to start my own business in
my early 30s. I intended to get into one of those one-make 'hobby' formulas
when I could afford it. There was a Peugeot tin-top series running in the
90s that was ~50 grand for a years racing - including car lease that I was
looking at. Open wheeler wasn't really an option by then as I was too busy
with work. The Peugeot series was basically pay for a test, then pay your
money if both parties happy, a couple weekends practice then just turn up at
each of ~12 races throughout the season (support series for touring cars) -
they took care of everything, had your car ready at each track for you to
jump in and go, even had a driving coach available. I figured I'd pay for a
year, see how it went, take it from there...

Then not long after I invested everything I had into my business I popped a
disc and lost it all, including any chance of getting into motor racing.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders)
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