Discussion:
Why?
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larkim
2018-05-27 08:40:44 UTC
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British grand Prix
Spanish grand Prix

Why not monagesque grand Prix?
geoff
2018-05-27 09:19:56 UTC
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Post by larkim
British grand Prix
Spanish grand Prix
Why not monagesque grand Prix?
Why not:

British Big Prize
Gran Premio De España ?

geoff
Brian W Lawrence
2018-05-27 09:54:21 UTC
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Post by larkim
British grand Prix
Spanish grand Prix
Why not monagesque grand Prix?
British & Spanish are English words, Monegasque is French.
However, the French and Monegasque wouldn't call it that
anyway. The 1960 Monaco GP was the XVIIIe Grand Prix Automobile de
Monaco. In that season some other races were:

VIIo Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina
IX Grote Prijs van Nederland
XX Grote Prijs van Belgie
46e Grand Prix de l'A.C.F. [France]
IX Grande Premio de Portugal
31o Gran Premio d'Italia

There wasn't a German GP in 1960, but in 1961 it was:

XXIII Grosser Preis von Deutschland

The last race this year was:

62nd Gran Premio de España Emirates

That said, many of the more recent new events have chosen to use
the English terms, partly because of sponsorship, partly to attract
visitors, etc.

For example, the last Grand Prix de Belgique was in 1995.
OTOH it's still the Grand Prix du Canada.

Forix has built up quite a good collection of official programme
covers - by no means complete, so any additions would be welcome.
They provide a useful reference to names of events, race sponsors,
etc.
Brian W Lawrence
2018-05-27 10:06:03 UTC
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46e Grand Prix de l'A.C.F.   [France]
I should have checked France before posting.

The last French GP run under the auspices of the A.C.F. (Automobile Club
de France) was in 1967, the 53rd event. In 1968 it became the Grand Prix
de France, organised by the FFSA (Fédération Française du Sport Automobile).
Brian W Lawrence
2018-05-27 10:30:09 UTC
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Post by Brian W Lawrence
Forix has built up quite a good collection of official programme
covers - by no means complete, so any additions would be welcome.
They provide a useful reference to names of events, race sponsors,
etc.
Many of Forix's covers were provided from this site:

<http://www.progcovers.com/motor/formula1.html>

Well worth browsing, includes 2018 AUS-AZB.
larkim
2018-05-27 17:57:50 UTC
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Monagasque is an adopted English word too. It’s what someone from Monaco is called (e,g Leclerc),

Similar applies though for Singapore - it’s not colloquially known as the Singaporean GP. And the US one is called the United States GP not the American GP.
Brian W Lawrence
2018-05-27 19:15:25 UTC
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Post by larkim
Monagasque is an adopted English word too. It’s what someone from Monaco is called (e,g Leclerc),
Quite, but we the English don't use it to refer to the F1 race held
in Monaco. Perhaps we should.
Post by larkim
Similar applies though for Singapore - it’s not colloquially known as the Singaporean GP.
The Argentinian GP was rarely called that, it was simply the Argentine GP.
Post by larkim
And the US one is called the United States GP not the American GP.
Yes, but there are many Americans who are not from the US - Canadians,
Mexicans, Brazilians, Argentines, Colombians, etc.

I suppose it depends on what a country is called (in English) and how
we add a suffix to denote someone from that country, or something
associated with that country.

British, Danish, Spanish, Irish, English, Scottish, Swedish, Finnish,
Polish

Australian, Austrian, German, Russian, Hungarian, Romanian, Croatian,
Chilean, Bulgarian

Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Lebanese, Maltese

Some seem to be unique - French, Swiss, Dutch, Welsh, Greek, Icelandic,

Really there are no rules, the words developed in different ways
M2T
2018-05-27 20:49:50 UTC
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Post by larkim
Monagasque is an adopted English word too. It’s what someone from Monaco is called (e,g Leclerc),
Similar applies though for Singapore - it’s not colloquially known as the Singaporean GP. And the US one is called the United States GP not the American GP.
The United States of America is commonly called the United States or
America.

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known
as the United Kingdom (UK) or, informally, Britain.

The Netherlands, commonly known, both informally and incorrectly, as
Holland.


Simples innit.
bra
2018-05-28 01:03:55 UTC
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Post by larkim
Monagasque is an adopted English word too. It’s what someone from Monaco is called (e,g Leclerc),
Similar applies though for Singapore - it’s not colloquially known as the Singaporean GP. And the US one is called the United States GP not the American GP.
I attended something called the 'John Player Special British Grand Prix in 1984'.
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