Discussion:
Video alert - Grand Prix (1966 movie) - BBC 2 next Friday
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m***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-08-12 14:46:53 UTC
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In case you haven't already seen it anyway;

Friday 18/8/2017

2.30pm, Grand Prix, BBC 2. A 1966 feature film. An American Formula One driver's career seems to be over when he is blamed for an accident that has left his British rival (at a team called Jordan!) severely injured. He joins a Japanese team though and begins planning his comeback, while also having an affair with the wife of the man he injured!

Drama, starring James Garner, Eva Marie Saint, Yves Montand and Toshiro Mifune

Made in the mid-engine era but before the wing era in F1.

(James Garner is essentially Phil Hill? Adolfo Celi is certainly supposed to be Enzo Ferrari).

Do F1 drivers still wear dog-tags like soldiers so they can be identified in the event of a mutilating death?
Sir Tim
2017-08-12 20:04:03 UTC
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Post by m***@yahoo.co.uk
In case you haven't already seen it anyway;
Friday 18/8/2017
2.30pm, Grand Prix, BBC 2. A 1966 feature film. An American Formula One
driver's career seems to be over when he is blamed for an accident that
has left his British rival (at a team called Jordan!) severely injured.
He joins a Japanese team though and begins planning his comeback, while
also having an affair with the wife of the man he injured!
Drama, starring James Garner, Eva Marie Saint, Yves Montand and Toshiro Mifune
Made in the mid-engine era but before the wing era in F1.
(James Garner is essentially Phil Hill?)
Phil Hill himself appears, briefly, in the film playing a character called
"Tim Randolph". More importantly he drove a GT40 pulling a mockup of the
front end of a GP car and managed to scare the shit out of some of the
actors (no CGI in those days).

It's very far from being a great film, although it somehow managed to win
three oscars, but well worth watching if only for the wonderful Spa
sequences
Post by m***@yahoo.co.uk
Adolfo Celi is certainly supposed to be Enzo Ferrari).
Yep.
Post by m***@yahoo.co.uk
Do F1 drivers still wear dog-tags like soldiers so they can be identified
in the event of a mutilating death?
Completely unnecessary, obviously. But most drivers in those days did have
their blood group embroidered on their overalls. Quite apart from being a
bit morbid this too was unnecessary as no medical unit would give a
transfusion without checking the patient's blood group first. However we
shouldn't be too cynical before checking how many of the real life drivers
who appear in the GPDA sequence are still alive :-(


Yes
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Sir Tim
t***@gmail.com
2017-08-13 02:56:09 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
It's very far from being a great film
Don't watch it then.
Go play with your wife's dry vagina instead.
Bobster
2017-08-13 08:10:45 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Phil Hill himself appears, briefly, in the film playing a character called
"Tim Randolph". More importantly he drove a GT40 pulling a mockup of the
front end of a GP car and managed to scare the shit out of some of the
actors (no CGI in those days).
It's very far from being a great film, although it somehow managed to win
three oscars, but well worth watching if only for the wonderful Spa
sequences
Do I recall correctly, that there was footage that used the twin circuit layout at Monza? Alternating laps on the circuit we all know and on the oval track?
Post by Sir Tim
Post by m***@yahoo.co.uk
Adolfo Celi is certainly supposed to be Enzo Ferrari).
Yep.
Post by m***@yahoo.co.uk
Do F1 drivers still wear dog-tags like soldiers so they can be identified
in the event of a mutilating death?
Completely unnecessary, obviously. But most drivers in those days did have
their blood group embroidered on their overalls. Quite apart from being a
bit morbid this too was unnecessary as no medical unit would give a
transfusion without checking the patient's blood group first. However we
shouldn't be too cynical before checking how many of the real life drivers
who appear in the GPDA sequence are still alive :-(
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968, where there was a 4 month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.

I always recall Damon Hill's chilling answer when asked what it was like growing up as the son of a World Champion racing driver: "We went to lots of funerals."
Post by Sir Tim
Yes
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Sir Tim
Brian W Lawrence
2017-08-13 12:19:44 UTC
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Post by Bobster
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968, where there was a 4
month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.
07 Apr 1968 Jim Clark Hockenheim, Germany
07 May 1968 Mike Spence Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
08 Jun 1968 Ludovico Scarfiotti Obersalzberg, Germany
07 Jul 1968 Jo Schlesser Rouen, France

Schlesser was the only one killed in an F1 race, and he was making his
debut.

Odd how the days of the month almost completely match.


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Sir Tim
2017-08-13 21:07:24 UTC
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Post by Brian W Lawrence
Post by Bobster
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968,
where there was a 4
month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.
07 Apr 1968 Jim Clark Hockenheim, Germany
07 May 1968 Mike Spence Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
08 Jun 1968 Ludovico Scarfiotti Obersalzberg, Germany
07 Jul 1968 Jo Schlesser Rouen, France
Schlesser was the only one killed in an F1 race, and he was making his
debut.
Odd how the days of the month almost completely match.
Others who appeared in the GPDA sequence were, IIRC, Bruce McLaren (killed
testing), Jo Bonnier (Le Mans) and Jochen Rindt (Monza). Lorenzo Bandini
also appears elsewhere in the film.
--
Sir Tim
Halmyre
2017-08-14 06:33:30 UTC
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Post by Brian W Lawrence
Post by Bobster
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968, where there was a 4
month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.
07 Apr 1968 Jim Clark Hockenheim, Germany
07 May 1968 Mike Spence Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
08 Jun 1968 Ludovico Scarfiotti Obersalzberg, Germany
07 Jul 1968 Jo Schlesser Rouen, France
Schlesser was the only one killed in an F1 race, and he was making his
debut.
Odd how the days of the month almost completely match.
I read a quote by someone (Stewart?) who said there was a huge sigh of relief when August came and went without incident. Everyone must have been on edge at a rain-soaked Nurburgring that month.
Bobster
2017-08-14 11:11:33 UTC
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Post by Halmyre
Post by Brian W Lawrence
Post by Bobster
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968, where there was a 4
month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.
07 Apr 1968 Jim Clark Hockenheim, Germany
07 May 1968 Mike Spence Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
08 Jun 1968 Ludovico Scarfiotti Obersalzberg, Germany
07 Jul 1968 Jo Schlesser Rouen, France
Schlesser was the only one killed in an F1 race, and he was making his
debut.
Odd how the days of the month almost completely match.
I read a quote by someone (Stewart?) who said there was a huge sigh of relief when August came and went without incident. Everyone must have been on edge at a rain-soaked Nurburgring that month.
Stewart scored a remarkable win. In terrible wet conditions he took the lead on lap 1 and eventually won by 4 minutes.

If anybody started saying that he was a coward, he could always point to a great victory in nasty weather on a track that he wanted removed from the calendar.
Sir Tim
2017-08-14 15:36:26 UTC
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Post by Halmyre
Post by Brian W Lawrence
Post by Bobster
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968, where there was a 4
month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.
07 Apr 1968 Jim Clark Hockenheim, Germany
07 May 1968 Mike Spence Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
08 Jun 1968 Ludovico Scarfiotti Obersalzberg, Germany
07 Jul 1968 Jo Schlesser Rouen, France
Schlesser was the only one killed in an F1 race, and he was making his
debut.
Odd how the days of the month almost completely match.
I read a quote by someone (Stewart?) who said there was a huge sigh of relief when August came and went without incident. Everyone must have been on edge at a rain-soaked Nurburgring that month.
Jim Clark's mechanics said that the team was always more relaxed once
Spa was over. Jimmy detested the place, yet still managed to win there
four times (and in successive years).

The Masta kink was probably the most challenging part of that, or any
other circuit. In those days it was necessary to lift, but only
*slightly*. Lift too much and you lost momentum the whole way down to
Stavelot; lift too little and you hit a house!

I'm not sure whether anybody was actually killed at Masta, most of the
Spa fatalities seem to have been in the Burnenville section. Brian may know.
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
Halmyre
2017-08-15 06:36:36 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Post by Halmyre
Post by Brian W Lawrence
Post by Bobster
Yes. Jackie Stewart recently issued a reminder of the goings on in 1968, where there was a 4
month stretch in which a contemporary Grand Prix driver was buried each month.
07 Apr 1968 Jim Clark Hockenheim, Germany
07 May 1968 Mike Spence Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
08 Jun 1968 Ludovico Scarfiotti Obersalzberg, Germany
07 Jul 1968 Jo Schlesser Rouen, France
Schlesser was the only one killed in an F1 race, and he was making his
debut.
Odd how the days of the month almost completely match.
I read a quote by someone (Stewart?) who said there was a huge sigh of relief when August came and went without incident. Everyone must have been on edge at a rain-soaked Nurburgring that month.
Jim Clark's mechanics said that the team was always more relaxed once
Spa was over. Jimmy detested the place, yet still managed to win there
four times (and in successive years).
The Masta kink was probably the most challenging part of that, or any
other circuit. In those days it was necessary to lift, but only
*slightly*. Lift too much and you lost momentum the whole way down to
Stavelot; lift too little and you hit a house!
I'm not sure whether anybody was actually killed at Masta, most of the
Spa fatalities seem to have been in the Burnenville section. Brian may know.
Motor Sport's DSJ said in 1968 that only two drivers went through Masta flat out - Stewart and Amon. Although Stewart said that he'd spotted Jenks at the kink and thought "damn, now I'll have to take it flat next time round", and spent the whole lap thinking about it. I don't know how he had time to notice bystanders; me, I'd probably not see anything except the inside of my eyelids...
Brian W Lawrence
2017-08-15 10:35:32 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
I'm not sure whether anybody was actually killed at Masta, most of the
Spa fatalities seem to have been in the Burnenville section. Brian may know.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Circuit_de_Spa-Francorchamps_fatalities>

That includes motorcycle fatalities too.





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m***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-08-17 16:34:11 UTC
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Later the Nurburgring was boycotted by the drivers in 1970 on safety grounds - the German GP had to be at Hockenheim that year.
m***@yahoo.co.uk
2017-08-17 16:58:01 UTC
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In the Brabham Boys documentary which occasionally is repeated on the Sky Sports F1 channel, Martin Brundle said that he went to Stefan Bellof's funeral, but found the experience so stressful (seeing all the grieving relatives etc) that Brundle decided never to attend another driver's funeral until Brundle had stopped racing himself.
Brian W Lawrence
2017-08-13 12:10:12 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
It's very far from being a great film, although it somehow managed to win
three oscars, but well worth watching if only for the wonderful Spa
sequences
Oscars were for:

Best Sound: Franklin Milton (MGM SSD)

Best Film Editing: Fredric Steinkamp, Henry Berman, Stu Linder, Frank
Santillo

Best Effects, Sound Effects: Gordon Daniel (Sound Editor)

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Prix_(1966_film)>

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Sir Tim
2017-08-14 16:00:57 UTC
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Post by Brian W Lawrence
Post by Sir Tim
It's very far from being a great film, although it somehow managed to win
three oscars, but well worth watching if only for the wonderful Spa
sequences
Best Sound: Franklin Milton (MGM SSD)
Best Film Editing: Fredric Steinkamp, Henry Berman, Stu Linder, Frank
Santillo
Best Effects, Sound Effects: Gordon Daniel (Sound Editor)
Thanks Brian. The split-screen effects at the beginning - close ups of
spanners tightening down nuts, driver's foot blipping the throttle etc -
probably look a bit old fashioned now but they were sensational at the
time, as was the cinema sound.
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
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