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Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections.
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Bigbird
2017-01-27 18:02:46 UTC
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Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections; yet, just maybe, he's
the greatest sporting administrator that there's ever been. For that,
you have to admire him, even if you don't like him.

http://tinyurl.com/je4ncql
Sir Tim
2017-01-27 18:34:00 UTC
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Post by Bigbird
Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections; yet, just maybe, he's
the greatest sporting administrator that there's ever been. For that,
you have to admire him, even if you don't like him.
http://tinyurl.com/je4ncql
When I read your post I had just finished reading Joe Saward's blog. One
of his contributors had this to say:

"So the old scoundrel has finally been ousted! It's the right thing to
do, his time has come and his methods have become obsolete. He was
absolutely the right man to help F1 'turn professional' back in the
eighties, but those days are gone. It's like the mob being pushed out of
Vegas by the corporate suits, it seemed impossible, but it happened and
the town is much more successful as a result."

Hit the nail on the head for me.
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
Bigbird
2017-01-27 19:32:46 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Post by Bigbird
Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections; yet, just maybe,
he's the greatest sporting administrator that there's ever been.
For that, you have to admire him, even if you don't like him.
http://tinyurl.com/je4ncql
When I read your post I had just finished reading Joe Saward's blog.
"So the old scoundrel has finally been ousted! It's the right thing
to do, his time has come and his methods have become obsolete. He was
absolutely the right man to help F1 'turn professional' back in the
eighties, but those days are gone. It's like the mob being pushed out
of Vegas by the corporate suits, it seemed impossible, but it
happened and the town is much more successful as a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
For most of us Bernie is an iceberg; we have no clue about most of what
he did and how he went about it. Even if you read all you could you
might only get a peep below the surface. For me that article was
written very much as the view a lot of us who follow the sport see him.
It dwells on the "trivial" because that is what we know for sure; that
is his public persona.

Consider the Financial Director of a company, makes/saves the company
millions with his clever accounting and deals with the banks. He's
noticably a bit lecherous with the young women in the company and gets
rudely drunk at the Christmas party. All the gossips in the company
talk about him as the lecherous sot. That doesn't mean they don't
appreciate that he is good at what he does... but the good work he does
does not get their attention. When he drops his trousers at the company
do it certainly does...

Bernie drops his trousers quite a lot.
Sir Tim
2017-01-28 11:42:46 UTC
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Post by Bigbird
Post by Sir Tim
Post by Bigbird
Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections; yet, just maybe,
he's the greatest sporting administrator that there's ever been.
For that, you have to admire him, even if you don't like him.
http://tinyurl.com/je4ncql
When I read your post I had just finished reading Joe Saward's blog.
"So the old scoundrel has finally been ousted! It's the right thing
to do, his time has come and his methods have become obsolete. He was
absolutely the right man to help F1 'turn professional' back in the
eighties, but those days are gone. It's like the mob being pushed out
of Vegas by the corporate suits, it seemed impossible, but it
happened and the town is much more successful as a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
For most of us Bernie is an iceberg; we have no clue about most of what
he did and how he went about it. Even if you read all you could you
might only get a peep below the surface. For me that article was
written very much as the view a lot of us who follow the sport see him.
It dwells on the "trivial" because that is what we know for sure; that
is his public persona.
As you say, Bernie has made sure that we know as little about his real
self as possible. I've read most of what is available in print about him
and regard Terry Lovell's book "Bernie's Game" as the best of the bunch,
but that was published in 2003 so misses out on Bernie's more recent
exploits.
I have actually met Bernie, albeit briefly. I was exhibiting my work on
the railings of Hyde Park and my next door neighbour, one of the few
*really* good artists on the Bayswater Road, was lurking in his van
trying to avoid "the punters". Bernie was immediately attracted by
Harry's work and approached me to enquire whether I was the artist. I
immediately extracted Harry from his van, telling him that this guy was
mega rich and he'd do well to speak nicely to him. Nothing came of the
negotiations but a rather shattered Harry said to me afterwards, "that
guy absolutely *exudes* power!"

http://www.harrybilson.co.uk/about.php
Post by Bigbird
Consider the Financial Director of a company, makes/saves the company
millions with his clever accounting and deals with the banks. He's
noticably a bit lecherous with the young women in the company and gets
rudely drunk at the Christmas party. All the gossips in the company
talk about him as the lecherous sot. That doesn't mean they don't
appreciate that he is good at what he does... but the good work he does
does not get their attention. When he drops his trousers at the company
do it certainly does...
Bernie drops his trousers quite a lot.
I think you should explain that you are writing metaphorically :-)

Whilst he has had 3 wives as well as a 17-year relationship with Tuana
Tan I don't think there has ever been any suggestion that Bernie is a
lecher. Power is *his* aphrodisiac.
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
Bigbird
2017-01-28 12:43:11 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Post by Bigbird
Post by Sir Tim
Post by Bigbird
Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections; yet, just maybe,
he's the greatest sporting administrator that there's ever been.
For that, you have to admire him, even if you don't like him.
http://tinyurl.com/je4ncql
When I read your post I had just finished reading Joe Saward's
"So the old scoundrel has finally been ousted! It's the right
thing to do, his time has come and his methods have become
obsolete. He was absolutely the right man to help F1 'turn
professional' back in the eighties, but those days are gone. It's
like the mob being pushed out of Vegas by the corporate suits, it
seemed impossible, but it happened and the town is much more
successful as a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
For most of us Bernie is an iceberg; we have no clue about most of
what he did and how he went about it. Even if you read all you
could you might only get a peep below the surface. For me that
article was written very much as the view a lot of us who follow
the sport see him. It dwells on the "trivial" because that is what
we know for sure; that is his public persona.
As you say, Bernie has made sure that we know as little about his
real self as possible. I've read most of what is available in print
about him and regard Terry Lovell's book "Bernie's Game" as the best
of the bunch, but that was published in 2003 so misses out on
Bernie's more recent exploits. I have actually met Bernie, albeit
briefly. I was exhibiting my work on the railings of Hyde Park and my
next door neighbour, one of the few really good artists on the
Bayswater Road, was lurking in his van trying to avoid "the punters".
Bernie was immediately attracted by Harry's work and approached me to
enquire whether I was the artist. I immediately extracted Harry from
his van, telling him that this guy was mega rich and he'd do well to
speak nicely to him. Nothing came of the negotiations but a rather
shattered Harry said to me afterwards, "that guy absolutely exudes
power!"
http://www.harrybilson.co.uk/about.php
Post by Bigbird
Consider the Financial Director of a company, makes/saves the
company millions with his clever accounting and deals with the
banks. He's noticably a bit lecherous with the young women in the
company and gets rudely drunk at the Christmas party. All the
gossips in the company talk about him as the lecherous sot. That
doesn't mean they don't appreciate that he is good at what he
does... but the good work he does does not get their attention.
When he drops his trousers at the company do it certainly does...
Bernie drops his trousers quite a lot.
I think you should explain that you are writing metaphorically :-)
Whilst he has had 3 wives as well as a 17-year relationship with
Tuana Tan I don't think there has ever been any suggestion that
Bernie is a lecher.
I certainly never meant to imply he was an accountant; heaven forbid.
Bobster
2017-01-28 15:37:00 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Whilst he has had 3 wives as well as a 17-year relationship with Tuana
Tan I don't think there has ever been any suggestion that Bernie is a
lecher. Power is *his* aphrodisiac.
Mosley says not. He says that when they were operating together Bernie was interested in the deal and the money, he (Max) was interested in the politics.

He tells a tale of the sitting in some anteroom at 10 Downing Street (this was before a meeting with Blair and Jowell about tobacco sponsorship). Bernie remarks on how transient it all is, you can be Prime Minister one day, get sent back where you came from the next. Max notes that Bernie manifestly preferred great wealth to great power.

Just to continue this, Max felt that politics was more interesting provided you had a certain amount of money up front - which he did.

Max notes that Bernie shows none of the characteristics of the person who seeks power or wants his ego burnished. He notes that Balestre always used to impose himself on the podium ceremonies, whereas Bernie never goes onto the podium and leaves that ceremony and that moment in the limelight to the drivers and the dignitaries.
Grant
2017-01-28 03:27:48 UTC
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It's like the mob being pushed out of Vegas by the corporate suits, it
seemed impossible, but it happened and the town is much more successful as
a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
This remains to be seen.
Bobster
2017-01-28 04:08:27 UTC
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Post by Grant
It's like the mob being pushed out of Vegas by the corporate suits, it
seemed impossible, but it happened and the town is much more successful as
a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
This remains to be seen.
The new owners are constrained by the Concorde until end 2020 (as are the teams). Now, that could be renegotiated, but the big teams are unlikely to want to play the the role of turkeys voting for Christmas. The new negotiations are when we'll find out what what sort of timber Liberty are built from.

It shouldn't need pointing out that the new owners expect to make money from F1. They are not entirely benevolent.

There is a chance that they will take a lower profit for the long term interests of the sport, whilst finding ways to monetise things like digital rights. Maybe deals with the likes of Facebook and Twitter that will allow pay-per-view access to race broadcasts.

There will be some more transparency. Liberty is a listed company and will have to produce annual figures. But listed companies also have to turn a profit for their shareholders.
alister
2017-01-28 13:50:30 UTC
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Post by Grant
It's like the mob being pushed out of Vegas by the corporate suits, it
seemed impossible, but it happened and the town is much more successful
as a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
This remains to be seen.
My experience of Vegas is that its success is diminishing.
there are considerably less free entertainments & some of the major
chains (MGM & now Caesars) are introducing car parking charges.

Not to mention the closure of some historically famous locations
(stardust 2006, Riviera 2015).

The gaming industry is no longer making enough profits to justify these
loss-leader attractions
--
...though his invention worked superbly -- his theory was a crock of
sewage from
beginning to end. -- Vernor Vinge, "The Peace War"
a425couple
2017-01-29 04:38:46 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
Ecclestone is a man of monstrous imperfections; ----
"So the old scoundrel has finally been ousted! It's the right thing to
do, his time has come and his methods have become obsolete. He was
absolutely the right man to help F1 'turn professional' back in the
eighties, but those days are gone. It's like the mob being pushed out of
Vegas by the corporate suits, it seemed impossible, but it happened and
the town is much more successful as a result."
Hit the nail on the head for me.
One of my memorable stories was when Ecclestone was trying
to run the Brabham team, but for whatever reason really
badly needed some wheels. Well Alain de Cadenet had
a couple of older Brabhams that used the needed wheels.
Those private cars were not going to run the current F1 race,
so when Bernie asked Alain if he could borrow them to get
out of the pinch, Alain agreed and furnished them.
Later, when Alain needed the wheels back, Bernie told
him they had been unsafe so had been destroyed.
But Bernie had had new wheels made and he could
sell some to Alain!

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