Discussion:
Oil burning episode whatever
(too old to reply)
Bobster
2017-09-03 05:05:26 UTC
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Anybody catch the Sky pre-qualifying show?

Discussion turned to oil burning. Now, bear in mind that they don't KNOW what is going on inside the engines, this is a game of deduction, but some things were presented pretty confidently IE that everybody burns oil and that there are legitimate reasons why this should be - mostly to do with lubricating the bearing to which the piston is connected.

They also stated fairly firmly that the "oil" is not a lot like what you or I put in our cars, it is very highly refined, has a very low viscosity and a relatively high calorific value. It also suppresses knock, or has additives that do that.

They reported that Merc are already at or below the new limit whilst Ferrari were still burning more at Spa. So suspicion, again, falls on Ferrari.

They discussed the matter of injecting into the combustion chamber or with the charge, then switched to an idea of Symonds', that there is a way that Merc and Ferrari have been feeding oil into the combustion chamber via the turbo. There was no suggestion that this was outside the letter of the law.

The benefits of this are
1) Knock is reduced, which, they say, allows greater turbo boost.
2) You get bigger bang per buck in each detonation

This is a grey area. It's not what FIA anticipated or wanted, but it is not forbidden by the regulations either.

Classic F1 engineering thinking: spotting a loophole in the rules and exploiting it for all it's worth.
.
2017-09-03 11:13:59 UTC
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Post by Bobster
Anybody catch the Sky pre-qualifying show?
Discussion turned to oil burning. Now, bear in mind that they don't KNOW what is going on inside the engines, this is a game of deduction, but some things were presented pretty confidently IE that everybody burns oil and that there are legitimate reasons why this should be - mostly to do with lubricating the bearing to which the piston is connected.
They also stated fairly firmly that the "oil" is not a lot like what you or I put in our cars, it is very highly refined, has a very low viscosity and a relatively high calorific value. It also suppresses knock, or has additives that do that.
They reported that Merc are already at or below the new limit whilst Ferrari were still burning more at Spa. So suspicion, again, falls on Ferrari.
They discussed the matter of injecting into the combustion chamber or with the charge, then switched to an idea of Symonds', that there is a way that Merc and Ferrari have been feeding oil into the combustion chamber via the turbo. There was no suggestion that this was outside the letter of the law.
The benefits of this are
1) Knock is reduced, which, they say, allows greater turbo boost.
2) You get bigger bang per buck in each detonation
This is a grey area. It's not what FIA anticipated or wanted, but it is not forbidden by the regulations either.
Classic F1 engineering thinking: spotting a loophole in the rules and exploiting it for all it's worth.
There is nothing new or remotely innovative about injecting fluid
into the combustion chamber to squelch pre-ignition/detonation
(aircraft engines have utilized the technique since WWII), as you've
already been spoonfed but were far too dense to comprehend, like
every other engineering principle that flies farther over the poseurs
heads here than the exosphere.
--
My mirror continues its finite yet unbounded journey.
Edmund
2017-09-03 11:27:40 UTC
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Post by Bobster
Anybody catch the Sky pre-qualifying show?
Discussion turned to oil burning. Now, bear in mind that they don't KNOW
what is going on inside the engines, this is a game of deduction, but
some things were presented pretty confidently IE that everybody burns
oil and that there are legitimate reasons why this should be - mostly to
do with lubricating the bearing to which the piston is connected.
They also stated fairly firmly that the "oil" is not a lot like what you
or I put in our cars, it is very highly refined, has a very low
viscosity and a relatively high calorific value. It also suppresses
knock, or has additives that do that.
They reported that Merc are already at or below the new limit whilst
Ferrari were still burning more at Spa. So suspicion, again, falls on
Ferrari.
It is also said elsewhere that Merc specifically introduced the new
engines so that they are allowed the higher oil use.
Post by Bobster
They discussed the matter of injecting into the combustion chamber or
with the charge, then switched to an idea of Symonds', that there is a
way that Merc and Ferrari have been feeding oil into the combustion
chamber via the turbo. There was no suggestion that this was outside the
letter of the law.
The benefits of this are 1) Knock is reduced, which, they say, allows
greater turbo boost.
2) You get bigger bang per buck in each detonation
This is a grey area. It's not what FIA anticipated or wanted, but it is
not forbidden by the regulations either.
Classic F1 engineering thinking: spotting a loophole in the rules and
exploiting it for all it's worth.
Bigbird
2017-09-03 11:52:41 UTC
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Post by Edmund
Post by Bobster
They reported that Merc are already at or below the new limit whilst
Ferrari were still burning more at Spa. So suspicion, again, falls
on Ferrari.
It is also said elsewhere that Merc specifically introduced the new
engines so that they are allowed the higher oil use.
Indeed; that is the speculation that has been rebutted by both the team
and other "sources".

"So if you ask the FIA, you will be quite interested to see what the
results are."

Sources have suggested that Mercedes' Spa engines ran below the 0.9l
per 100km level during the Belgian GP, so would have complied with the
new restriction anyway.
Edmund
2017-09-03 13:31:26 UTC
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Post by Bigbird
Post by Edmund
Post by Bobster
They reported that Merc are already at or below the new limit whilst
Ferrari were still burning more at Spa. So suspicion, again, falls on
Ferrari.
It is also said elsewhere that Merc specifically introduced the new
engines so that they are allowed the higher oil use.
Indeed; that is the speculation that has been rebutted by both the team
and other "sources".
"So if you ask the FIA, you will be quite interested to see what the
results are."
Sources have suggested that Mercedes' Spa engines ran below the 0.9l per
100km level during the Belgian GP, so would have complied with the new
restriction anyway.
Yup and they even had the additional fuel, just in case.

Edmund

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