Discussion:
Williams - the film
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Sir Tim
2017-11-25 10:55:07 UTC
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I watched the documentary "Williams"last night. It’s currently
available on Netflix in the UK, not sure about other countries.The film
focuses mainly on Sir Frank, his wife Ginny and daughter Claire with
substantial contributions from Frank Dernie ("Nigel was a superb driver
but an absolute arse!") and Dave Brodie (anyone involved in saloon car
racing in the 60s and 70s will remember "Run Baby Run"). Howden Ganley,
Alan Jones, Nigel Mansell, Jacques Villeneuve and Patrick Head all
contribute (but not, interestingly, Damon Hill).

I found the time sequence a bit muddled and there were not that many
racing clips but it was nevertheless a fascinating, and sometimes
emotional, glimpse into the Williams family dynamic. My main impression
of Sir Frank himself is that he is a deeply flawed individual:
unemotional, relentlessly competitive, no interest in literature or the
arts, totally obsessed with motor racing - perhaps you have to be that
way to succeed.

Or perhaps after his great friend Piers Courage was killed driving the
Williams-entered de Tomaso at Zandvoort Frank forced himself to reject
any form of emotional response. Combined with his intense
competitiveness this must have helped him survive the appalling injuries
he later suffered in France.

Thinking back to that 1970 season I remember strolling around the
paddock before the race and looking at the Williams transporter (more of
a large van really). It was rather scruffy and the signwritten name
"Piers Courage" on the side had been crudely painted out but still
showed through (Brian Redman drove the car IIRC). I remember thinking,
"now that’s a team without a future"!
--
Sir Tim

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional”
M2T
2017-11-25 12:56:12 UTC
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I watched the documentary "Williams"last night.  It’s currently
available on Netflix in the UK, not sure about other countries.The film
focuses mainly on Sir Frank, his wife Ginny and daughter Claire with
substantial contributions from Frank Dernie ("Nigel was a superb driver
but an absolute arse!") and Dave Brodie (anyone involved in saloon car
racing in the 60s and 70s will remember "Run Baby Run"). Howden Ganley,
Alan Jones, Nigel Mansell, Jacques Villeneuve and Patrick Head all
contribute (but not, interestingly, Damon Hill).
I found the time sequence a bit muddled and there were not that many
racing clips but it was nevertheless a fascinating, and sometimes
emotional, glimpse into the Williams family dynamic. My main impression
unemotional, relentlessly competitive, no interest in literature or the
arts, totally obsessed with motor racing - perhaps you have to be that
way to succeed.
Or perhaps after his great friend Piers Courage was killed driving the
Williams-entered de Tomaso at Zandvoort Frank forced himself to reject
any form of emotional response. Combined with his intense
competitiveness this must have helped him survive the appalling injuries
he later suffered in France.
Thinking back to that 1970 season I remember strolling around the
paddock before the race and looking at the Williams transporter (more of
a large van really). It was rather scruffy and the signwritten name
"Piers Courage" on the side had been crudely painted out but still
showed through (Brian Redman drove the car IIRC). I remember thinking,
"now that’s a team without a future"!
Frank Williams is an arsehole, no better than the Little Shit who's
recently departed F1. How many times did he buy and sell the same car
to that poor Italian racer? Mark Webber is one of many who've were
pleased to leave Williams. At least he left on his own terms, unlike
other drivers. Williams and Head drove Adrian Newey away by badly
treating him. Since then, they've achieved nothing. What goes around
comes around.
bra
2017-11-25 17:30:13 UTC
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On Saturday, November 25, 2017 at 4:56:15 AM UTC-8, M2T wrote:

The BT24/ 1968 Brabham-Repco F1 car purchased by Frank Williams for Piers to drive in 1969 was significantly modified in the basement of Aubrey Leighton’s garage in Earls Barton five miles east of Northampton. John Thompson did the manufacturing work.

Aubrey Leighton had been the 1957 stock car champion,
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No implied connotations intended ;-)
bra
2017-11-26 00:44:30 UTC
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Post by bra
The BT24/ 1968 Brabham-Repco F1 car purchased by Frank Williams for Piers to drive in 1969 was significantly modified in the basement of Aubrey Leighton’s garage in Earls Barton five miles east of Northampton. John Thompson did the manufacturing work.
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John Thopmson, BTW, also constructed three of Ferrari's 312B3 monocoques in Earls Barton, parochial though it appears --- Thompson was recommended to Ferrari by Firestone's Brucce Harre, and further trivia, the work was assisted by stock-car champ Aubrey Leighton's son Keith, who apart from being Ronnie Petersons chief F1 mech. and working at Cosworth, went on to 'spanner" Indianapolis cars, a long long way from Earls Barton.
bra
2017-11-26 00:45:56 UTC
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Aubrey Leighton's son Keith, who apart from being Ronnie Petersons chief F1

CORRECTION: F2, F2!
t***@gmail.com
2017-11-26 00:54:45 UTC
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Post by M2T
Frank Williams is an arsehole
And you took the dumbfuck path.
m***@gmail.com
2017-11-25 17:46:35 UTC
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Post by Sir Tim
I watched the documentary "Williams"last night. It’s currently
available on Netflix in the UK, not sure about other countries.The film
focuses mainly on Sir Frank, his wife Ginny and daughter Claire with
substantial contributions from Frank Dernie ("Nigel was a superb driver
but an absolute arse!") and Dave Brodie (anyone involved in saloon car
racing in the 60s and 70s will remember "Run Baby Run"). Howden Ganley,
Alan Jones, Nigel Mansell, Jacques Villeneuve and Patrick Head all
contribute (but not, interestingly, Damon Hill).
I found the time sequence a bit muddled and there were not that many
racing clips but it was nevertheless a fascinating, and sometimes
emotional, glimpse into the Williams family dynamic. My main impression
unemotional, relentlessly competitive, no interest in literature or the
arts, totally obsessed with motor racing - perhaps you have to be that
way to succeed.
Or perhaps after his great friend Piers Courage was killed driving the
Williams-entered de Tomaso at Zandvoort Frank forced himself to reject
any form of emotional response. Combined with his intense
competitiveness this must have helped him survive the appalling injuries
he later suffered in France.
Thinking back to that 1970 season I remember strolling around the
paddock before the race and looking at the Williams transporter (more of
a large van really). It was rather scruffy and the signwritten name
"Piers Courage" on the side had been crudely painted out but still
showed through (Brian Redman drove the car IIRC). I remember thinking,
"now that’s a team without a future"!
Williams is interesting to me because he was not very successful at first, and didn't show many signs of being successful. The first time his team started doing well was after he sold it.

But he's tough. The success of the Wolf team should have been a humiliation for Williams, but Wolf is gone and Williams recovered, built a new team, won championships and is still with us.
Mark Jackson
2017-11-25 17:56:55 UTC
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I watched the documentary "Williams"last night.  It’s currently
available on Netflix in the UK, not sure about other countries.
A quick glance at justwatch.com suggests it's available on Netflix in
the US.
--
Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
Making people laugh is the lowest form of comedy.
- Michael O'Donoghue
m***@yahoo.com
2017-11-30 05:11:20 UTC
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Post by Mark Jackson
I watched the documentary "Williams"last night.  It’s currently
available on Netflix in the UK, not sure about other countries.
A quick glance at justwatch.com suggests it's available on Netflix in
the US.
--
Mark Jackson - http://www.alumni.caltech.edu/~mjackson
Making people laugh is the lowest form of comedy.
- Michael O'Donoghue
https://solarmoviez.ru/movie/williams-22687/1102608-14/watching.html
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